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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BHNRC) » Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center » Diet, Genomics and Immunology Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #332096

Research Project: Regulatory Mechanisms Induced by Health-Promoting Bioactive Food Components on Sex Steroid Hormone-Dependent Pathways, Cancer Cell-Stromal Cell Interactions, and the Gut Microbiome

Location: Diet, Genomics and Immunology Laboratory

Title: Red cabbage microgreens lower circulating LDL, liver cholesterol and inflammatory cytokines in mice fed a high fat diet

Author
item Jiang, Xiaojing - University Of Maryland
item Huang, Hiaqiu - University Of Maryland
item Xiao, Zhenlei - University Of Minnesota
item Yu, Lu - University Of Maryland
item Pham, Quynhchi
item Yokoyama, Wallace - Wally
item Yu, Liangli - University Of Maryland
item Luo, Yaguang - Sunny
item Wang, Thomas - Tom

Submitted to: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/8/2016
Publication Date: 12/7/2016
Citation: Jiang, X., Huang, H., Xiao, Z., Yu, L., Pham, Q., Yokoyama, W.H., Yu, L., Luo, Y., Wang, T.T. 2016. Red cabbage microgreens lower circulating LDL, liver cholesterol and inflammatory cytokines in mice fed a high fat diet. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 64(48):9161-9171.

Interpretive Summary: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor. Population studies, as well as animal and intervention studies, support the consumption of a variety of vegetables as a means to reduce CVD risk through the modulation of hypercholesterolemia. Microgreens are tiny edible greens harvested from a variety of vegetables and herbs at 7-14 days after germination of the seeds and have been reported to be more nutrient-dense compared to their mature counterparts. However, little is known about the effectiveness of microgreens to affect lipid and cholesterol levels. The present study used a rodent diet-induced obesity (DIO) model to address this question. C57BL/6NCr mice (n=60, male, five-week old) were randomly assigned to six feeding groups: 1) low fat diet; 2) high fat diet; 3) low fat diet+1.95% red cabbage microgreens; 4) low fat diet+1.95% mature red cabbage; 5) high fat diet+1.95% red cabbage microgreens; 6) high fat diet+1.95% mature red cabbage. The animals were on their respective diets for eight weeks. We found microgreen supplementation attenuated a high fat diet-induced weight gain. Moreover, supplementation with microgreens significantly lowered circulating LDL levels in animals fed the high fat diet. These data suggest that microgreens can modulate weight gain and cholesterol metabolism and may protect against CVD by preventing hypercholesterolemia. The study provides information for a translational scientist on the health-promoting effects of microgreen and mechanistic information for the basic scientist regarding how microgreens may work to promote health.

Technical Abstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor. Population studies, as well as animal and intervention studies, support the consumption of a variety of vegetables as a means to reduce CVD risks through the modulation of hypercholesterolemia. Microgreens are tiny, edible greens harvested from a variety of vegetables and herbs at 7-14 days after the germination of their seeds, and have been reported to be more nutrient-dense compared to their mature counterparts. However, little is known about the effectiveness of microgreens to affect lipid and cholesterol levels. The present study used a rodent diet-induced obesity (DIO) model to address this question. C57BL/6NCr mice (n=60, male, five-week old) were randomly assigned to six feeding groups: 1) low fat diet; 2) high fat diet; 3) low fat diet+1.95% red cabbage microgreens; 4) low fat diet+1.95% mature red cabbage; 5) high fat diet+1.95% red cabbage microgreens; 6) high fat diet+1.95% mature red cabbage. The animals were on their respective diets for eight weeks. We found microgreen supplementation attenuated a high fat diet-induced weight gain. Moreover, supplementation with microgreens significantly lowered circulating LDL levels in animals fed the high fat diet. These data suggest that microgreens can modulate weight gain and cholesterol metabolism and may protect against CVD by preventing hypercholesterolemia.