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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Gainesville, Florida » Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology » Mosquito and Fly Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #326017

Research Project: Biting Arthropod Surveillance and Control

Location: Mosquito and Fly Research

Title: Field evaluations of residual pesticide applications and misting system on militarily relevant materials against medically important mosquitoes in Thailand

Author
item Pongsiri, Arissara - Armed Forces Research Institute Of Medical Sciences
item Ponlawat, Alongkot - Armed Forces Research Institute Of Medical Sciences
item Kijchalao, U - Armed Forces Research Institute Of Medical Sciences
item Britch, Seth
item Linthicum, Kenneth - Ken

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/7/2016
Publication Date: 2/11/2016
Citation: Pongsiri, A., Ponlawat, A., Kijchalao, U., Britch, S.C., Linthicum, K. 2016. Field evaluations of residual pesticide applications and misting system on militarily relevant materials against medically important mosquitoes in Thailand. Meeting Abstract [abstract]. American Mosquito Control Association Annual Meeting. February 7-11, 2016, Savannah, Georgia. P-05.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: A key strategy to reduce insect-borne disease is to reduce contact between disease vectors and hosts. In the current study, residual pesticide application and misting system were applied on militarily relevant materials and evaluated against medically important mosquitoes. Field evaluations were carried out in Chanthaburi province, Thailand from February to July 2015. Groups of ground-mounted structure of HESCO geotextile (2x3 m) and camouflage netting (3x3 m) were constructed. These materials are extensively used for perimeter defense during US military field operation. The residual pesticide formulation containing '-cyhalothrin and the pesticide misting system containing permethrin were applied on each type of structures. To evaluate effects of residual treatment and misting system, day and night biting mosquitoes were collected using BG sentinel traps and CDC light traps, respectively. Results demonstrated that treated HESCOs and camouflage netting enclosures substantially reduced mosquitoes (=50%) compared to untreated units. Moreover, misters significantly reduced mosquito populations at treated units more than treated structures without misters. The effect of residual pesticide on materials lasted for more than two weeks but could not be retained to week ten after application in this tropical climate. Residual pesticide applications and misting system on militarily relevant materials revealed the promising results for mosquito control in Thailand.