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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BHNRC) » Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center » Food Components and Health Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #325862

Research Project: Absorption, Metabolism, and Health Impacts of Bioactive Food Components

Location: Food Components and Health Laboratory

Title: The impact of cranberries on gut microbiota and cardiometabolic health: proceedings of the cranberry health research conference

Author
item Blumberg, Jeffrey - Tufts University
item Basu, Arpita - Oklahoma State University
item Krueger, Christian - University Of Wisconsin
item Lila, Mary - North Carolina State University
item Neto, Catherine - University Of Massachusetts
item Novotny, Janet
item Reed, Jess - University Of Wisconsin
item Rodriguez-mateos, Ana - University Of Dusseldorf
item Toner, Cheryl - Ocean Spray Cranberry

Submitted to: Advances in Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/11/2016
Publication Date: 7/1/2016
Citation: Blumberg, J.B., Basu, A., Krueger, C.G., Lila, M.A., Neto, C.C., Novotny, J., Reed, J.D., Rodriguez-Mateos, A., Toner, C.D. 2016. The impact of cranberries on gut microbiota and cardiometabolic health: Proceedings of the cranberry health research conference. Advances in Nutrition. 7:759-770.

Interpretive Summary: Dietary guidance is consistent in recommending greater consumption of fruits and vegetables to promote health. Amongst fruits and vegetables, berry fruits are particularly promising in their ability to lower biomarkers of disease risk. There has been a growing body of evidence that the phytochemical composition of berry fruits may differentiate them from other fruits and underlie some of their putative benefits. Cranberries are particularly rich in phytochemicals, particularly a class of compounds called polyphenols. There has been significant research activity in the past decade demonstrating health benefits of cranberry products. With respect to cardiovascular disease, intake of cranberry juice or extract has been shown to reduce blood pressure, general inflammation, circulating blood fat, and oxidative damage to blood components. Cranberry intake has also been shown to improve the body’s handling of sugar. Because of the unusual A-type linkages found in cranberry components called proanthocyanidins, cranberries reduce the ability of bacteria to adhere to the bladder wall, thus preventing urinary tract infections. Controlled studies have demonstrated that other compounds in cranberries also contribute to this benefit. Finally, colonic bacteria are sensitive to cranberry intake, and metabolites generated in the colon may play a role in mechanism for all these effects. This information will be used by scientists, health practitioners, and policy makers.

Technical Abstract: Dietary guidance is consistent in recommending greater consumption of fruits and vegetables to promote health. Amongst fruits and vegetables, berry fruits are particularly promising in their ability to lower biomarkers of disease risk. There has been a growing body of evidence that the phytochemical composition of berry fruits may differentiate them from other fruits and underlie some of their putative benefits. Cranberries are particularly rich in phytochemicals, particularly polyphenols. There has been significant research activity in the past decade demonstrating health benefits of cranberry products. With respect to cardiovascular disease, intake of cranberry juice or extract has been shown to reduce blood pressure, c-reactive protein, triglycerides, and oxidized low density lipoproteins. Cranberry intake has also been shown to lower fasting insulin and reduce insulin sensitivity. Because of the A-type linkages found in cranberry proanthocyanidins, cranberries reduce the ability of bacteria to adhere to the bladder wall, thus preventing urinary tract infections. Controlled studies have demonstrated that other compounds in cranberries also contribute to this benefit. Finally, colonic microbiota are sensitive to cranberry intake, and metabolites generated in the colon may play a role in mechanism for all these effects.