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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Davis, California » Crops Pathology and Genetics Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #323584

Research Project: Sustainable Vineyard Production Systems

Location: Crops Pathology and Genetics Research

Title: Grapevine pruning systems and cultivars influence the diversity of wood-colonizing fungi

Author
item Travadon, Renaud - UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA
item Lecomte, Pascal - INSTITUT NATIONAL DE LA RECHERCHE AGRONOMIQUE (INRA)
item Diarra, Barka - INSTITUT NATIONAL DE LA RECHERCHE AGRONOMIQUE (INRA)
item Lawrence, Daniel - UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA
item Renault, David - BORDEAUX AGRO SCIENCES
item Ojeda, Hernan - INSTITUT NATIONAL DE LA RECHERCHE AGRONOMIQUE (INRA)
item Rey, Patrice - BORDEAUX AGRO SCIENCES
item Baumgartner, Kendra

Submitted to: Fungal Ecology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/14/2016
Publication Date: 10/17/2016
Citation: Travadon, R., Lecomte, P., Diarra, B., Lawrence, D.P., Renault, D., Ojeda, H., Rey, P., Baumgartner, K. 2016. Grapevine pruning systems and cultivars influence the diversity of wood-colonizing fungi. Fungal Ecology. 24:82-93.

Interpretive Summary: The wood of grapevines is infected by many different types of fungal species, including wood pathogens and wood decomposers, which may collectively have a negative impact on crop productivity. This study aims at comparing the effects of two pruning systems, minimal (min-) or spur-pruning, on the sanitary status of vine trunks and the diversity of all wood-colonizing fungi, which can infect the vine through the pruning wounds. A molecular technique known as ‘Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism’, combined with the technique of culturing the fungi and identifying them to the species level, were used to describe the fungal communities. Fungal communities varied with pruning system. Spur-pruned vines hosted a more diverse fungal community than min-pruned vines, and the latter had less wood necrosis. Multivariate statistics (specifically Canonical Correspondence Analysis) revealed differences in specific wood pathogens between pruning systems. Among the 15 most frequently cultured species, nine had their highest relative abundances in spur-pruned vines. Greater levels of wood necrosis in spur-pruned vines may be due to a greater diversity of wood-colonizing species, the composition of the fungal community, or to the facilitative interactions among them that enhance wood decomposition.

Technical Abstract: Grapevines host diverse fungal species, including pruning-wound pathogens and wood decomposers, with detrimental effects on crop productivity. This study aims at comparing the effects of two pruning systems, minimal (min-) or spur-pruning, on the sanitary status of vine trunks and the diversity of wood-colonizing fungi. Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism and ITS-DNA sequencing of 88 cultivable taxa were used to describe the fungal communities. Fungal communities varied with pruning system. Spur-pruned vines hosted a more diverse fungal community than min-pruned vines, and the latter had less wood necrosis. Canonical Correspondence Analysis revealed differences in specific trunk pathogens between pruning systems. Among the 15 most frequently cultured taxa, nine had their highest relative abundances in spur-pruned vines. Greater levels of wood necrosis in spur-pruned vines may be due to a greater diversity of wood-colonizing taxa, the composition of the fungal community, or to the facilitative interactions among them that enhance wood decomposition.