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ARS Home » Plains Area » College Station, Texas » Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center » Food and Feed Safety Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #319686

Research Project: MICROBIAL INTERACTIONS AND MANAGEMENT APPROACHES TO REDUCE PATHOGENIC BACTERIA IN POULTRY

Location: Food and Feed Safety Research

Title: Performance, blood parameters and meat yield in broiler chickens supplemented with Mexican oregano oil

Author
item Silva-vazquez, Ramon - Universidad Autonoma De Chihuahua
item Duran-melendez, Lorenzo - Universidad Autonoma De Chihuahua
item Santellano-estrad, Eduardo - Universidad Autonoma De Chihuahua
item Rodriguez-muela, Carlos - Universidad Autonoma De Chihuahua
item Villalobos, Guillarmo - Universidad Autonoma De Chihuahua
item Hume, Michael
item Mendez-zamora, Gerado - Universidad Autonoma De Nuevo Leon

Submitted to: Revista Brasileira de Zootecnia
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/1/2016
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: This study was conducted to evaluate the inclusion of Mexican oregano oil (MOO) in broiler diets during grow-out on production, blood parameters, and meat yield. Broilers were divided into three equal groups (treatments): CON = control diet (without oregano oil or antibiotic); ANT = control diet + the antibiotic oxytetracycline; and MOO = control diet + Mexican oregano oil. Production variables were body weight, feed intake, feed efficiency (FE), and average daily gain. Mexican oregano oil increased body weight by the end of grow-out. Average daily gain was higher at grow-out with MOO compared to CON. The CON group presented the highest feed intake throughout the grow-out period while ANT had the lowest, and feed efficiency for CON was higher during grow-out when compared to MOO. Total cholesterol was increased due to increased high density lipoprotein. Treatment with ANT reduced levels of low density lipoprotein more than those in the CON group. Although CON had greater very low density lipoproteins compared to ANT and very low density lipoproteins, the difference was not significant. Triglycerides and meat yield were not affected by treatment. In conclusion, incorporation of MOO in the diet had direct benefits on performance, blood parameters, and meat production of broilers during grow-out. These results are of interest to researchers and growers seeking alternatives to antibiotics as growth promoters to enhance growth in broiler chickens.

Technical Abstract: This study was conducted to evaluate the inclusion of Mexican oregano oil (MOO) Lippia berlandieri Schauer in broiler diets during grow-out on performance, blood parameters, and meat yield. One hundred and sixty-two one-day-old broilers, randomly divided into three equal groups (treatments): CON = control diet (without oregano oil or antibiotic); ANT = control diet + 0.0025 g/kg of oxytetracycline; and MOO = control diet + 0.4 g/kg of Mexican oregano oil. Performance variables were body weight (BW), feed intake (FI), feed efficiency (FE), and average daily gain (ADG). Mexican oregano oil had an effect on BW at 35 and 42 d (P = 0.01). Average daily gain was different (P = 0.05) at 42 d with MOO presenting the highest and compared to CON. The CON group presented the highest (P = 0.01) FI for days 1 to 42 while ANT had the lowest, and FE for CON was higher (P = 0.01) for days 1 to 42 when compared to MOO over the same period. Blood parameters were different (P = 0.05) at 42 d for cholesterol (CHOL), high density lipoprotein (HDL), and low density lipoprotein (LDL). Total CHOL was increased (P < 0.05) due to increased HDL (P = 0.05). Treatment with ANT reduced levels of LDL more than those in the CON group. Although CON had greater very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) compared to ANT and VLDL, the difference was not significant. Triglycerides, blood biometrics, and meat yield were not affected (P = 0.05) by treatment. In conclusion, incorporation of MOO in the diet had direct benefits on performance, blood parameters, and meat production of broilers during grow-out.