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Research Project: Sustainable Production, Profit, and Environmental Stewardship through Conservation Systems

Location: Soil Dynamics Research

Title: Economics of conservation systems research in the Southeastern United States

Author
item Duzy, Leah
item Balkcom, Kipling
item Kornecki, Ted
item Price, Andrew

Submitted to: Soil and Water Conservation Society
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/15/2015
Publication Date: 7/28/2015
Citation: Duzy, L.M., Balkcom, K.S., Kornecki, T.S., Price, A.J. 2015. Economics of conservation systems research in the Southeastern United States [abstract]. Soil and Water Conservation Society Conference. http://www.swcs.org/documents/filelibrary/15ac/Abstract_Book_FINAL_31A269C46D632.pdf.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: The use of conservation systems in crop production is not a new concept in the southeastern United States. In 1978, researchers from across the Southeast met in Griffin, Georgia for the first annual Southern Conservation Agricultural Systems Conference. Four of the ten presentations specifically mentioned the use of winter annual crops as a mulch as part of a “no-till plus” system. Today this system is more commonly called a conservation system. At the 1988 conference, one of the invited presentations was on the economics of conservation tillage research in Texas. This presentation placed emphasis on the importance of economics in evaluating conservation practices, particularly related to tillage. While technology related to conservation systems has changed since the 1980’s, the need for evaluating economics in conservation systems research has not changed. Current conservation systems research strives to investigate agronomic and economic benefits of conservation systems given current technology and environmental conditions. The objectives of this presentation are to discuss the importance of economics in evaluating conservation systems, identify economic benefits and costs of conservation systems, and summarize current economics of conservation systems research from the Southeast.