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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Dawson, Georgia » National Peanut Research Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #316032

Research Project: Enhancing the Competitiveness of U.S. Peanuts and Peanut-based Cropping Systems

Location: National Peanut Research Laboratory

Title: Chemical Interruption of Flowering to Improve Harvested Peanut Maturity

Author
item Lamb, Marshall
item Sorensen, Ronald - Ron
item Butts, Christopher - Chris
item Dang, Phat
item Arias De Ares, Renee
item CHEN, CHARLES - Auburn University
item DAVIS, J - Jla Global

Submitted to: American Peanut Research and Education Society Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/11/2015
Publication Date: 6/14/2015
Citation: Lamb, M.C., Sorensen, R.B., Butts, C.L., Dang, P.M., Arias De Ares, R.S., Chen, C., Davis, J.P. 2015. Chemical Interruption of Flowering to Improve Harvested Peanut Maturity. American Peanut Research and Education Society Abstracts. Charleston, SC.

Interpretive Summary: none required.

Technical Abstract: Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is a botanically indeterminate plant where flowering, fruit initiation, and pod maturity occurs over an extended time period during the growing season. As a result, the maturity and size of individual peanut pods varies considerably at harvest. Immature kernels that meet commercial edible size specifications negatively affect quality during processing due to their increased propensity for off flavors, higher moisture and water activity, and variable roasting properties. As peanuts progress toward maturation, late season flowering and subsequent pod development result in immature pods that will not have sufficient time to mature prior to harvest. Research was conducted from 2012 to 2014 at six irrigated and non-irrigated locations in the Southeastern peanut belt to determine the effect of late season flower termination on peanut yield, grade, and post-harvest processing characteristics. Two pesticides, (Diflufenzopyr-Na (D-Na) (BASF Biosciences)) and Glyphosate, were applied at three lower than normal rates and at two timings and compared with a “hand removal” and a non-treated control. When pooled across locations, application rates, and years, pod yield with D-Na and Glyphosate treatments were 9% and 4% greater than the untreated control, respectively. Sound Mature Kernels and Sound Splits were increased 1.5 percent. Specific rates and application timings within D-Na showed the highest and most consistent improvement on peanut yield, grade, and post-harvest processing characteristics.