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ARS Home » Southeast Area » New Orleans, Louisiana » Southern Regional Research Center » Commodity Utilization Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #315654

Title: Chemical composition of defatted cottonseed and soy meal products

Author
item He, Zhongqi
item ZHANG, HAILIN - Oklahoma State University
item Olk, Daniel - Dan

Submitted to: PLoS ONE
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/19/2015
Publication Date: 6/16/2015
Citation: He, Z., Zhang, H., Olk, D.C. 2015. Chemical composition of defatted cottonseed and soy meal products. PLoS One. 10(6):1-13.

Interpretive Summary: Much of the cotton land in the US is located in the southern and southeastern region which includes Georgia, Alabama, Arkansas, North Carolina, Mississippi, and Texas. Harvesting and ginning a cotton crop generates two marketable products: lint and seed. Although accounting for about 60% of biomass of cotton bolls, cottonseed products provide only a secondary revenue stream of the cotton crop (15-25% of the value of the crop), and mainly from the oil fraction. For better and economic utilization of the different functional fractions in cottonseed meal, we have separated meal into several fractions with different water solubility. The contents of gossypol, total protein and amino acids, fiber and carbohydrates, and selected macro and trace elements in these products were determined. Data reported in this work improved our understanding on the chemical composition of different cottonseed meal products that is helpful for more economical utilization of these products. These data would also provide a basic reference for product standards and quality control when the production of the cottonseed meal products comes to pilot and industrial scales.

Technical Abstract: Chemical composition is critical information for product quality and exploration of new use. Hence defatted cottonseed meals from both glanded (with gossypol) and glandless (without gossypol) cotton seeds were separated into water soluble and insoluble fractions, or water soluble, alkali soluble as well as total protein isolates. The contents of gossypol, total protein and amino acids, fiber and carbohydrates, and selected macro and trace elements in these products were determined and compared with each other and with those of soy meal products. Data reported in this work improved our understanding on the chemical composition of different cottonseed meal products that is helpful for more economical utilization of these products. These data would also provide a basic reference for product standards and quality control when the production of the cottonseed meal products comes to pilot and industrial scales.