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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Exotic & Emerging Avian Viral Diseases Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #314959

Research Project: Intervention Strategies to Control and Prevent Disease Outbreaks Caused by Avian Influenza and Other Emerging Poultry Pathogens

Location: Exotic & Emerging Avian Viral Diseases Research

Title: Ecology of influenza A and Newcastle disease viruses in wild birds and poultry in Eastern Siberia (2012-2014)

Author
item Sivay, Maria - Federal State Budgetary Scientific Institution "research Institute Of Experimental And Clinical Med
item Sharshov, Kiryl - Federal State Budgetary Scientific Institution "research Institute Of Experimental And Clinical Med
item Gulyaeva, Marina - Novosibirsk State University
item Pantin-jackwood, Mary
item Swayne, David
item Shestopalov, Alexander - Federal State Budgetary Scientific Institution "research Institute Of Experimental And Clinical Med

Submitted to: International Symposium on Avian Influenza
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/30/2015
Publication Date: 4/12/2015
Citation: Sivay, M., Sharshov, K., Gulyaeva, M., Pantin Jackwood, M.J., Swayne, D.E., Shestopalov, A. 2015. Ecology of influenza A and Newcastle disease viruses in wild birds and poultry in Eastern Siberia (2012-2014) [abstract]. 9th International Symposium on Avian Influenza, Athens, Georgia. p. 66.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: The Russian Territory covering a large part of Northern Eurasia is of special interest for influenza virus ecology and evolution, for it is situated in the center of Eurasia and covers three major migration routes, combining bird populations from Asia, Africa, and Europe. During surveillance for avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) (2012-2014) in Northern Eurasia (Russia, Mongolia, Kazakhstan), a total of 8125 samples from wild birds and poultry were collected. The samples belong to the orders of Anseriformes (14 species), Charadriiformes (6 species) and Passeriformes (2 species), as well as poultry, taken from various sites located in Western and Eastern Siberia and Far East. Specimens were tested for AIV and NDV by standard methods according to WHO (World Health Organization) and OIE (Office International des Epizooties/World Organisation for Animal Health) manuals. In total, 66 AIVs and 4 NDVs were isolated during this period. The AIVs were subtyped as H1N1, H2N1, H3N2, H2N2, H3N8, H4N6, H4N8, H5N1, H5N2, H5N3, H8N4, H11N8, H10N6, and H13N6. We couldn’t determine some virus subtypes by standard approaches, study is in progress. According to databases, the AIV H2 subtype has never been detected from wild birds in Russia previously. The avian H1N1 subtype was detected in Eastern Siberia in 2009 and 2011, but it is not prevalent in wild bird populations. Only one LPAI H7N2 subtype was isolated in the spring of 2013 (intravenous pathogenicity index (ICPV)= 0). Seven H5 with different neuraminidases were isolated in autumn of 2014. All these viruses are also low pathogenic for chickens (IVPI=0). The report focuses on more detailed comparative virological, molecular, pathogenic characteristics of viruses.