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ARS Home » Southeast Area » New Orleans, Louisiana » Southern Regional Research Center » Food and Feed Safety Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #314163

Research Project: Control of Aflatoxin Production by Targeting Aflatoxin Biosynthesis

Location: Food and Feed Safety Research

Title: A novel gastrointestinal microbiome modulator from soy pods reduces absorption of dietary fat in mice

Author
item Boue, Stephen
item FORTGANG, ILANA - Tulane School Of Medicine
item LEVY, RONALD - LSU Agcenter
item Bhatnagar, Deepak
item BUROW, MATTHEW - Tulane University
item FAHEY, GEORGE - University Of Illinois
item HEIMAN, MARK - Microbiome Theraputics

Submitted to: Obesity
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/11/2015
Publication Date: 1/20/2016
Citation: Boue, S.M., Fortgang, I., Levy, R.J., Bhatnagar, D., Burow, M., Fahey, G., Heiman, M.L. 2016. A novel gastrointestinal microbiome modulator from soy pods reduces absorption of dietary fat in mice. Obesity. 24(1):87-95.

Interpretive Summary: Diet impacts the composition of the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiome and it has shifted toward unprecedented fat and sugar. Because dietary habits are difficult to change, we developed a novel GI microbiome modulator as an intervention. Male mice were fed 3 different diets for 30 d; high-fat diet, high-fat diet containing 15% activated soy pod fiber (ASPF), or high-fat diet containing 15% unactivated soy pod fiber (USPF). USPF was a novel fiber preparation from whole soy pods and ASPF was that preparation activated to produce glyceollins. Mice fed the ASPF diet did not gain body fat when compared to the other 2 groups. This was associated with decreased absorption of calories and increased fecal excretion of triglycerides. A shift in abundances of microbiota in 11 genera were also observed. We developed a novel dietary intervention derived from soy pods that acts as a GI microbiome modulator to hinder absorption of dietary fat and sugar in mice. More studies with this GI microbiome modulator in animal models of diet-induced GI dysfunction are needed.

Technical Abstract: Diet impacts the composition of the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiome and it has shifted toward unprecedented fat and sugar. Because dietary habits are difficult to change, we developed a novel GI microbiome modulator (GIMM) as an intervention. Male mice were fed 1 of 3 isocaloric diets for 30 d; obesogenic diet (ObD), ObD containing 15% activated soy pod fiber (ObD-ASPF), or ObD containing 15% unactivated soy pod fiber (ObD-USPF). USPF was a novel fiber preparation from whole soy pods and ASPF was that preparation activated to produce glyceollins. Mice fed ObD-ASPF did not gain body fat when compared to the other 2 groups (p < 0.05). This was associated with decreased absorption of calories (p < 0.05) and increased fecal excretion of triglycerides, which may be attributed to decreased bile acid secretion (p < 0.05). A shift (p < 0.05) in abundances of microbiota in 11 genera were also observed. Colon inflammation was observed in only the USPF-treated mice. Mice fed ObD-ASPF had elevated plasma concentrations of the anti-inflammatory IL-10 (p < 0.05) and decreased (p < 0.05) plasma concentrations of the neutrophil chemoattractant CXCL1. We developed a novel dietary intervention derived from soy pods that acts as a GIMM to hinder absorption of dietary fat and sugar in mice. More studies with this GIMM in animal models of diet-induced GI dysfunction are needed. Possible indications are nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases, obesity, type 2 diabetes (T2D), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), autism, and chronic constipation.