Skip to main content
ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Exotic & Emerging Avian Viral Diseases Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #313141

Research Project: Characterization of Protective Host Responses to Avian Influenza Virus Infections in Avian Species

Location: Exotic & Emerging Avian Viral Diseases Research

Title: Application of new vaccine technology to improve immunity and productivity: advantages and challenges

Author
item Kapczynski, Darrell
item Pantin-jackwood, Mary
item Spackman, Erica
item Suarez, David
item Swayne, David

Submitted to: American College of Poultry Veterinarians
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/1/2015
Publication Date: 3/22/2015
Citation: Kapczynski, D.R., Pantin Jackwood, M.J., Spackman, E., Suarez, D.L., Swayne, D.E. 2015. Application of new vaccine technology to improve immunity and productivity: advantages and challenges [abstract]. In: Proceedings of the American College of Poultry Veterinarians, March 22, 2015, Sacramento, California. CDROM.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Vaccines play a critical role in the poultry industry’s efforts to protect animals against disease. However, providing safe, efficacious, and cost-effective vaccines remains a constant concern to the industry. Recent advances in avian immunology, genetics, molecular biology, and pathogenesis have greatly increased our understanding of the host-pathogen interaction and have led to the development of a variety of new vaccine strategies for producing more effective vaccines. While the use of conventional killed organisms to induce serum antibodies is tried and true, we know that vaccines that also target mucosal or cellular immunity will enhance efficacy by stimulating multiple arms of the immune system. Thus, with an improved understanding of the requirements of protective immunity, it should be possible to develop those with increased efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness for those diseases where current vaccines are not optimal.