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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Exotic & Emerging Avian Viral Diseases Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #312627

Research Project: Intervention Strategies to Control and Prevent Disease Outbreaks Caused by Avian Influenza and Other Emerging Poultry Pathogens

Location: Exotic & Emerging Avian Viral Diseases Research

Title: Cellular and humoral mediated immunity and distribution of viral antigen in chickens after infection with a low pathogenic avian influenza virus (H4N6) isolated from wild ducks

Author
item Shutchenko, Pavlo - National Scientific Center
item Muzyka, Denys - National Scientific Center
item Lillehoj, Hyun
item Pantin-jackwood, Mary
item Stegniy, Boris - National Scientific Center
item Medvid, Kateryna - National Scientific Center
item Rula, Olexander - National Scientific Center

Submitted to: International Symposium on Avian Influenza
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/15/2015
Publication Date: 4/15/2015
Citation: Shutchenko, P., Muzyka, D., Lillehoj, H.S., Pantin Jackwood, M.J., Stegniy, B., Medvid, K., Rula, O. 2015. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity and distribution of viral antigen in chickens after infection with a low pathogenic avian influenza virus (H4N6) isolated from wild ducks [abstract]. 9th International Symposium on Avian Influenza, Athens, Georgia. p. 85.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Four-week-old commercial chickens were intranasally inoculated with an H4N6 low pathogenicity avian influenza virus (LPAIV) isolated from a duck in Ukraine. Cecum, spleen, lung, and trachea samples were collected from birds from 1 to 21 days post inoculation (dpi) and examined by immunohistochemical techniques to determine the distribution of LPAIV antigen and immune markers. A suppression of the immune response in spleen and lungs was observed during the first five days after infection, with reduction in the number of macrophages and cells expressing CD4, immunoglobulins (Ig) M, G, and A. A sharp increase in the number of these cells was observed later starting on day 7 until day 21. The cell immunity response in spleen in terms of CD4 (38.6 ± 1.6%) and macrophage (28 ± 0.4%) staining was stronger than the humoral response. On the contrary, in the lung, humoral immune response, in terms of IgM (6.8 ± 0.5%), IgG (9.4 ± 1.3%), IgA (8.6 ± 0.19%) staining, was stronger. High levels of interferon gamma, interleukin-2, interleukin-15 were present on 7 dpi. We also found LPAIV nucleoprotein staining in the trachea, with high levels observed on 10 dpi (2.7 ± 0.4%), as well as in spleen (3.3 ± 0.2%) on 5 dpi. No viral antigen was found in other organs. In conclusion, this LPAIV did not cause clinical disease but replicated in trachea and spleen and affected both the cellular and humoral immune response in chickens.