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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Davis, California » Crops Pathology and Genetics Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #310466

Research Project: Sustainable Vineyard Production Systems

Location: Crops Pathology and Genetics Research

Title: Grower perceptions of preventative practices for management of trunk diseases of grape

Author
item Baumgartner, Kendra
item Travadon, Renaud - University Of California
item Hillis, A Vicken - University Of California
item Kaplan, Jonathan - California State University
item Cooper, M - University Of California - Cooperative Extension Service
item Lubell, Mark - University Of California

Submitted to: American Phytopathological Society Annual Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/30/2014
Publication Date: 6/15/2014
Publication URL: http://www.apsnet.org/meetings/Documents/2014_meeting_abstracts/aps2014abO100.htm
Citation: Baumgartner, K., Travadon, R., Hillis, A., Kaplan, J., Cooper, M., Lubell, M. 2014. Grower perceptions of preventative practices for management of trunk diseases of grape. American Phytopathological Society Annual Meeting. 100-0.

Interpretive Summary: There are three practices [delayed pruning, double pruning, pruning-wound protectants] that researchers have shown to prevent grapevine trunk diseases. Nonetheless, they are often not adopted until >20% show symptoms of trunk diseases, and this happens typically when the vineyard is 8 to 10 years old. Our goal is to encourage growers to adopt these practices in young vineyards. To determine where growers use which practices and when, and thus where we need to improve outreach, we surveyed 350 grape growers in five California regions (Napa-Sonoma, Central Coast, N. San Joaquin, S. San Joaquin, N. California). Growers answered questions on practice usage (never to always), vineyard age when practice was adopted (0-3, 4-7, 8-12, and 13+ years), and perceptions of disease-control efficacy and cost-effectiveness (ineffective to effective). In all but one region (Napa-Sonoma), preventative practices were adopted in vineyards >8 years old (with an average disease incidence level of 15%). Delayed pruning was most common except in Sonoma, where pruning-wound protectants were more common. Growers who adopt a practice in vineyards <8 years old also had positive perceptions of efficacy and cost-effectiveness, suggesting that adopting the practice before the symptoms appear does indeed bring about positive results (i.e., it maintains yields and is thus cost-effective).

Technical Abstract: Trials on prevention of trunk diseases (e.g., Eutypa dieback) show that three practices [delayed pruning, double pruning, pruning-wound protectants] prevent pruning-wound infections by 25-100%. Nonetheless, they are often not adopted until disease incidence is >20% in mature vineyards. There are no eradicative controls. Our goal is thus to encourage adoption in young vineyards. We surveyed 350 grape growers in five California regions (Napa-Sonoma, Central Coast, N. San Joaquin, S. San Joaquin, N. California) using the audience-response software Turning Point, in extension meetings. Growers answered questions on practice usage (never to always), vineyard age when practice was adopted (0-3, 4-7, 8-12, and 13+ years), and perceptions of disease-control efficacy and cost-effectiveness (ineffective to effective). In all but one region (Napa-Sonoma), preventative practices were adopted in vineyards >8 years old, with mean disease incidence of 15%. Delayed pruning was most common except in Sonoma, where pruning-wound protectants were most common. Growers who adopt a practice in vineyards <8 years old also had positive perceptions of efficacy and cost-effectiveness, suggesting that timing the practice before symptoms appear does indeed maintain yields and is cost-effective. With a clear understanding of their usage and perceptions, we will develop new extension tools that better communicate to growers the case for preventing trunk diseases in young vineyards.