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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BHNRC) » Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center » Food Components and Health Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #309616

Research Project: Metabolism and Molecular Targets of Macro and Micro Food Components in the Development and Management of Obesity and Chronic Diseases

Location: Food Components and Health Laboratory

Title: Kinetics of post-exercise excess CO2 production and substrate oxidation in two dysglycemic and euglycemic older women a case study

Author
item GRIBOK, ANDREI - UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE
item Rumpler, William
item DIPIETRO, LORETTA - GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Diabetes Case Reports
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/22/2016
Publication Date: 5/24/2016
Citation: Gribok, A., Rumpler, W.V., Dipietro, L. 2016. Kinetics of post-exercise excess CO2 production and substrate oxidation in two dysglycemic and euglycemic older women a case study. Diabetes Case Reports. 1. https://doi.org/10.4172/2572-5629.1000107.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4172/2572-5629.1000107

Interpretive Summary: We examine fuel utilization in two older women, one with impaired glucose tolerance and the other normal. Both subjects stayed in the room-size calorimeter for 48 hours and performed three bouts of postprandial exercise on the second day. The oxygen consumption (VO2) and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) have been estimated for the whole 48-hour experiment. The increases and decreases of O2 consumption and the ratio of VCO2 to VO2 (RQ) reflected the changes in carbohydrate as energy source in more in the pre diabetic woman than in normal woman. Also, the rate of post-exercise excessive CO2 output, quantified as the time lag between peaks in O2 consumption and peaks in RQ was found to be higher in the pre diabetic woman. For the first time, results relating the excess CO2 and impaired glucose tolerance are presented.

Technical Abstract: We examine the case of post-exercise excess CO2 production and instantaneous substrate oxidation in two older women, one with impaired glucose tolerance and the other one is euglycemic. Both subjects stayed in the room-size calorimeter for 48 hours and performed three bouts of postprandial exercise on the second day. The instantaneous gas exchange rates have been estimated along with the instantaneous respiratory exchange ratio (RER) for the whole 48- hour experiment. The relative dynamics of O2 consumption and RER showed a greater reliance on the carbohydrate as energy source in dysglycemic woman than in euglycemic woman. Also, the rate of post-exercise excessive CO2 output, quantified as the time lag between peaks in O2 consumption and peaks in RER was found to be higher in dysglycemic woman suggesting heavier reliance on anaerobic metabolism during exercise. For the first time, results relating the excess post-exercise CO2 production and impaired glucose tolerance are presented.