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ARS Home » Plains Area » College Station, Texas » Southern Plains Agricultural Research Center » Food and Feed Safety Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #309060

Research Project: INTERVENTIONS TO REDUCE FOODBORNE PATHOGENS IN SWINE AND CATTLE

Location: Food and Feed Safety Research

Title: Effects of commercial selenium products on glutathione peroxidase activity and semen quality in stud boars

Author
item Petrujkic, Branko - University Of Belgrade
item Sefer, Dragan - University Of Belgrade
item Jocanovic, Ivan - University Of Belgrade
item Jovicin, Milovan - Veterinary Institute Jsc Subotica
item Jankovic, S. - University Of Belgrade
item Jakovljevic, G. - University Of Belgrade
item Beier, Ross
item Anderson, Robin

Submitted to: Animal Feed Science And Technology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/2/2014
Publication Date: 1/10/2014
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/59794
Citation: Petrujkic, B.T., Sefer, D.S., Jocanovic, I.B., Jovicin, M., Jankovic, S., Jakovljevic, G., Beier, R.C., Anderson, R.C. 2014. Effects of commercial selenium products on glutathione peroxidase activity and semen quality in stud boars. Animal Feed Science And Technology. 197:194-205.

Interpretive Summary: The aim of this study was to determine how dietary supplementation of inorganic and organic selenium affects the selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in blood and sperm of sexually mature stud boars. Selenium is an essential component of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), an enzyme that is a powerful scavenger of free radicals. Twenty-four boars of the optimal breeding age were used. The study was conducted over 90 days. The concentration of selenium was determined in whole blood and semen, and the activity of GPx was measured in blood plasma and semen. The highest-concentration of selenium in blood was determined in the group of boar’s supplemented with organic selenium. Blood plasma GPx activity was higher in boars fed organic selenium. The highest-concentration of selenium in semen was also in the group of boars supplemented with organic selenium. Reactivated GPx activity in the semen was statistically no different between supplementation with inorganic or organic selenium.

Technical Abstract: The aim of this study was to determine how dietary supplementation of inorganic and organic selenium affects selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in blood and sperm of sexually mature stud boars. Twenty-four boars of the Large White, Landrace, Pietrain, and Duroc breeds of optimal breeding age (on average 2½ years old) were used. The study lasted 90 days. The boars were randomly assigned to one of three dietary treatment groups: T1 = control - no added selenium (n = 8 boars), T2 = added 0.3 ppm inorganic selenium (Microgran® Se 1% BMP) (n = 8 boars), and T3 = added 0.3 ppm organic selenium (Sel-Plex 2000®) (n = 8 boars). The concentration of selenium was determined in whole blood and semen, while the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) was measured in blood plasma and semen. In order to measure GPx activity in semen, reactivation of the enzymatic GPx activity was required. The highest-concentration of selenium in blood was determined in the group of boars supplemented with organic selenium. Blood plasma GPx activity was higher in boars fed organic selenium than in boars fed a diet without supplemented selenium. The highest-concentration of selenium in semen at the end of the trial was determined in the group of boars supplemented with organic selenium, somewhat lower in boars fed supplemented inorganic selenium, and the lowest in the non-supplemented group of boars. Reactivated GPx activity in the semen was statistically no different between supplementation with inorganic or organic selenium.