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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BHNRC) » Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center » Nutrient Data Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #306314

Title: Development of USDA's expanded flavonoid database: A Tool for Epidemiological Research

Author
item Bhagwat, Seema
item Haytowitz, David
item Wasswa-kintu, Shirley - University Of Maryland
item Pehrsson, Pamela

Submitted to: British Journal of Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/10/2015
Publication Date: 6/29/2015
Publication URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114515001580
Citation: Bhagwat, S.A., Haytowitz, D.B., Wasswa-Kintu, S., Pehrsson, P.R. 2015. Development of USDA's expanded flavonoid database: A Tool for Epidemiological Research. British Journal of Nutrition. DOI: 10.1017/S0007114515001580.

Interpretive Summary: The scientific community continues to be interested in potential links between flavonoid intakes and beneficial health effects associated with certain chronic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, some cancers and type 2 diabetes. Three separate flavonoid databases (Flavonoids (5 subclasses: flavonols, flavan 3-ols, flavones, flavanones and anthocyanidins), Isoflavones and Proanthocyanidins) developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service since 2003 with frequent updates have been used to estimate dietary flavonoid intakes and investigate their health effects by scientists in U.S., Europe, Australia and China. These databases do not contain values for every flavonoid compound in the six flavonoid subclasses for all foods despite an extensive literature search for analytical data. Epidemiologists interested in estimating flavonoid intakes of the populations, would need to calculate the missing values in these databases. The USDA has combined and expanded two of these databases (Flavonoids and Isoflavones) and developed a separate expanded database that includes approximately 2,900 foods with full flavonoid profiles for 29 predominant dietary flavonoid compounds in six flavonoid subclasses. Proanthocyanidins will be expanded and added in the near future. The process of expanding the databases includes various calculation techniques. These techniques along with challenges encountered and resolution of the challenges are described in detail. The expanded flavonoid database will be a useful tool for epidemiological studies to assess dietary intakes of these flavonoid compounds.

Technical Abstract: The scientific community continues to be interested in potential links between flavonoid intakes and beneficial health effects associated with certain chronic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, some cancers and type 2 diabetes. Three separate flavonoid databases (Flavonoids (5 subclasses: flavonols, flavan 3-ols, flavones, flavanones and anthocyanidins), Isoflavones and Proanthocyanidins) developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service since 2003 with frequent updates have been used to estimate dietary flavonoid intakes and investigate their health effects by scientists in U.S., Europe, Australia and China. These databases do not contain values for every flavonoid compound in the six flavonoid subclasses for all foods despite an extensive literature search for analytical data. Epidemiologists interested in estimating flavonoid intakes of the populations, would need to calculate the missing values in these databases. The USDA has combined and expanded two of these databases (Flavonoids and Isoflavones) and developed a separate expanded database that includes approximately 2,900 foods with full flavonoid profiles for 29 predominant dietary flavonoid compounds in six flavonoid subclasses. Proanthocyanidins will be expanded and added in the near future. The process of expanding the databases includes various calculation techniques. These techniques along with challenges encountered and resolution of the challenges are described in detail. The expanded flavonoid database will be a useful tool for epidemiological studies to assess dietary intakes of these flavonoid compounds.