Skip to main content
ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Endemic Poultry Viral Diseases Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #301027

Research Project: Intervention Strategies to Control and Prevent Enteric Viral Diseases of Poultry

Location: Endemic Poultry Viral Diseases Research

Title: Antibody response to chicken parvovirus following inoculation with inactivated virus and recombinant viruses expressing chicken parvovirus viral protein 2(VP2).

Author
item Zsak, Laszlo
item Yu, Qingzhong
item Spatz, Stephen

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/5/2014
Publication Date: 7/21/2014
Citation: Zsak, L., Yu, Q., Spatz, S.J. 2014. Antibody response to chicken parvovirus following inoculation with inactivated virus and recombinant viruses expressing chicken parvovirus viral protein 2(VP2) [abstract]. Annual Meeting of American Association of Avian Pathologists. p. 92.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: We reported earlier that day-old broiler chickens showed typical runting-stunting syndrome (RSS) post infection with chicken parvovirus (ChPV). There was also evidence that ChPV-specific maternal antibodies could provide significant protection against parvovirus induced enteric disease. Here, we studied the antibody response in 3-5 weeks old SPF and commercial broiler chickens to ChPV following inoculation(s) with either inactivated chicken parvovirus or recombinant viruses which expressed the ChPV major structural protein VP2. Virus specific IgA, IgG and IgM antibody responses were determined using a previously described in-house ELISA assay. Our data indicate that antibodies (primarily IgG) against ChPV could be detected as early as 7 days post infection with both inactivated virus and VP2-recombinants; however, long term persistence of anti ChPV antibodies (more than 4 weeks) could only be achieved by repeated inoculations. This study suggests the need for multiple immunizations with parvovirus antigens to maintain a continuous ChPV specific antibody level in adult layers, which will subsequently provide with consistent source of protective maternal antibodies to their offsprings.