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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Peoria, Illinois » National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research » Plant Polymer Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #298124

Research Project: MODIFICATION OF NATURAL POLYMERS BY NOVEL PROCESSES

Location: Plant Polymer Research

Title: Texturized pinto bean protein fortification in straight dough bread formulation

Author
item Simons, Courtney - North Dakota State University
item Hunt-schmidt, Emily - North Dakota State University
item Simsek, Senay - North Dakota State University
item Hall, Clifford - North Dakota State University
item Biswas, Atanu

Submitted to: Plant Foods for Human Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/24/2014
Publication Date: 9/1/2014
Citation: Simons, C.W., Hunt-Schmidt, E., Simsek, S., Hall, C., Biswas, A. 2014. Texturized pinto bean protein fortification in straight dough bread formulation. Plant Foods for Human Nutrition. 69:235-240.

Interpretive Summary: The objective of this study was to examine if protein rich Pinto bean flour can be used as an ingredient in conjunction with wheat flour to make bread with higher protein content. Pinto beans were air milled and extruded to obtain texturize high protein fraction (THPF) which was then milled to obtain flour, and combined with wheat flour at 5%, 10%, and 15% levels to make bread. Total protein and lysine contents in composite flours increased significantly as THPF levels increased in composite flour. Bread with 5% pinto protein had 48% more lysine than the 100% wheat flour (control). We made high protein bread by baking a mixture of Pinto bean flour and wheat flour. Thus, we demonstrated that addition of protein rich Pinto bean flour enriches the protein content of the wheat bread. This result, which demonstrates the usefulness of Pinto beans, will benefit bean growers and processors.

Technical Abstract: Pinto beans were milled and then air-classified to obtain a raw high protein fraction (RHPF) followed by extrusion to texturize the protein fraction. The texturized high protein fraction (THPF) was then milled to obtain flour, and combined with wheat flour at 5%, 10%, and 15% levels to make bread. Air-classification process produced flour with high concentration of lipids and phytic acid in the protein-rich fraction. However, extrusion significantly reduced both lipids and phytic acid. Total protein and lysine contents in composite flours increased significantly as THPF levels increased in composite flour. Bread with 5% pinto protein had 48% more lysine than the 100% wheat flour (control). Protein texturization from extrusion helped to maintain dough strength by reducing mixing tolerance index (MTI), maintaining dough stability and increasing departure time on Farinograph. Bread loaf volume was significantly reduced above 5% THPF addition. THPF increased water absorption causing an increase in bread weights by up to 6%. Overall, loaf quality deteriorated at 10% and 15% THPF levels while bread with 5% THPF was not significantly different from the control.