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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Morris, Minnesota » Soil Management Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #142481

Title: DELAYED WEED EMERGENCE AND ESCAPE FROM CONTROL IN GLYPHOSATE-TOLERANT SOYBEAN

Author
item HENNEN, SUSAN
item SCURSONI, JULIO
item Forcella, Frank
item GUNSOLUS, JEFF

Submitted to: North Central Weed Science Society US Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/5/2002
Publication Date: 12/5/2002
Citation: HENNEN, S., SCURSONI, J., FORCELLA, F., GUNSOLUS, J. DELAYED WEED EMERGENCE AND ESCAPE FROM CONTROL IN GLYPHOSATE-TOLERANT SOYBEAN. NORTH CENTRAL WEED SCIENCE SOCIETY ABSTRACTS. 2002. V. 57. P. 126.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Delayed weed emergence may be an important factor governing the type of species and number of individual plants that escape control in cropping systems employing glyphosate-tolerant crops. We examined this possibility in field plots within the state-wide soybean herbicide trials conducted by the University of Minnesota Research and Outreach Centers at Lamberton, Morris, Potsdam and Waseca (2 sites). Weed emergence was monitored periodically in weedy check plots. End of season weed populations were assessed in the one-pass and two-pass glyphosate treatments. The number of escaped plants in the two-pass treatment was only a small fraction of those that escaped control in the one-pass treatment. Nevertheless, plants that escaped control typically belonged to the species that had low cumulative relative emergence values at the time of glyphosate applications. Common lambsquaters (Chenopodium album) was the species that most often escaped control by glyphosate.