Skip to main content
ARS Home » Midwest Area » Morris, Minnesota » Soil Management Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #127973

Title: MODELIZACION DE LA EMERGENCIA DE PLANTULAS DE AVENA LOCA (AVENA FATUA L.) USANDO TIEMPO HIDROTERMAL

Author
item GONZALEZ-ANDUJAR, J
item Forcella, Frank
item KEGODE, G
item GALLAGHER, R
item VAN ACKER, R

Submitted to: Congresso de la Sociedad Espanola de Malherbologia
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/22/2001
Publication Date: 11/22/2001
Citation: GONZALEZ-ANDUJAR, J.L., FORCELLA, F., KEGODE, G., GALLAGHER, R., VAN ACKER, R. MODELIZACION DE LA EMERGENCIA DE PLANTULAS DE AVENA LOCA (AVENA FATUA L.) USANDO TIEMPO HIDROTERMAL. PROCEEDINGS OF CONGRESSO DE LA SOCIEDAD ESPANOLA DE MALHERBOLOGIA. 2001. P. 243-246.

Interpretive Summary: Wild oat is one of the worst weeds of small grain crops throughout the world. One of the main difficulties in managing wild oat is properly timing the operation of mechanical control equipment (e.g., plows and harrows) or application of herbicides. Data sets of wild oat emergence and soil microclimate have been used to develop a predictive seedling emergence model for wild oat. The model is based on the concept of accumulated hydrothermal time, which is very much like growing degree- days. Hydrothermal time uses daily soil temperature at the 2-inch depth to calculate time, but modifies the calculation according to the availability of water in the soil. The purpose of such models is to allow farmers, crop consultants and agri-chemical industry personnel to better estimate the timing of wild oat seedling emergence, and adjust and improve their weed management decisions accordingly. Improved wild oat management will be beneficial for any crop in which this wide- ranging species is a problem.

Technical Abstract: Data sets of wild oat (Avena fatua L.) emergence and soil microclimate have been amassed from Minnesota and North Dakota (USA), Manitoba (Canada), and Western Australia (Australia). These data are being used to develop predictive seedling emergence models for wild oat. At present the data sets from the USA have been analyzed and a preliminary model of wild oat seedling emergence developed. The model is based on the concept of accumulated hydrothermal time. Hydrothermal time uses daily soil temperature at the 5-cm depth to calculate time, but modifies the calculation according to the availability of water in the soil. The purpose of such models is to allow farmers, crop consultants and agri- chemical industry personnel to better estimate the timing of wild oat seedling emergence, and adjust and improve their weed management decisions accordingly. Improved wild oat management will be beneficial for any crop in which this wide-ranging species is a problem.