Skip to main content
ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Tucson, Arizona » SWRC » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #73136

Title: MULTIPLE OBJECTIVE DECISION MAKING FOR "LOKAHI" (BALANCE) IN ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

Author
item Yakowitz, Diana
item HIPEL, K.

Submitted to: Applied Mathematics and Computation
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/1/1997
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Innovative advances and applications in decision-making involving multiple objectives contained in a set of papers to be published in an upcoming special issue of Applied Mathematics and Computation are summarized, assessed and compared with regard to their usefulness in environmental management. Since many of the multiple objective decision making methods and associated decision support systems used in environmental management originate from the engineering field of operations research (OR), techniques from OR are categorized by types of objectives and number of decision makers involved. The applications presented in the papers reviewed clearly demonstrate that a range of OR and other scientific methods are usually required for properly modelling, analyzing and solving real-world environmental management problems.

Technical Abstract: Innovative advances and applications in multiple objective decision-making (MODM) contained in set of papers to be published in an upcoming special issue of Applied Mathematics and Computation are summarized, assessed and compared with regard to their usefulness for tackling complex problems in environmental management. Since many of the multiple objective decision making methods and associated decision support systems used in environmental management originate from the field of operations research (OR), techniques from OR are categorized with respect to their abilities to handle multiple objectives and multiple decision makers. The applications presented in the forthcoming papers clearly demonstrate that a range of OR and other scientific methods are usually required for properly modelling, analyzing and solving real-world environmental management problems.