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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Poplarville, Mississippi » Southern Horticultural Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #398867

Research Project: Blueberry and Woody Ornamental Plant Improvement in the Southeast United States

Location: Southern Horticultural Research

Title: Evaluation of one-time applications of foliar applied auxin co-applied with surfactant for use in commercial cutting propagation

Author
item BOWDEN, ANTHONY - Mississippi State University
item KNIGHT, PATRICIA - Mississippi State University
item RYALS, JENNY - Mississippi State University
item COKER, CHRISTINE - Mississippi State University
item LANGLOIS, SCOTT - Mississippi State University
item BRODERICK, SHAUN - Mississippi State University
item BLYTHE, EUGENE - Mississippi State University
item Sakhanokho, Hamidou
item Babiker, Ebrahiem

Submitted to: Agronomy Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/19/2022
Publication Date: 9/20/2022
Citation: Bowden, A.T., Knight, P.R., Ryals, J.B., Coker, C.E., Langlois, S.A., Broderick, S.R., Blythe, E.K., Sakhanokho, H.F., Babiker, E.M. 2022. Evaluation of one-time applications of foliar applied auxin co-applied with surfactant for use in commercial cutting propagation. Agronomy Journal. 12(10):2243. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy12102243.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy12102243

Interpretive Summary: Plant propagation places a large demand on labor within the nursery industry, with one recent report stating that labor accounts for over 50% of a nursery’s budget. Use of foliar auxin applications are increasing in the nursery and greenhouse industry to help with this problem. However, previous research has shown that insufficient auxin is absorbed or translocated to the site of action when foliar auxin applications are used. It is theorized that adding surfactants to foliar applications of auxin may help with the absorption and translocation of auxin to the site of action. Research was conducted to determine whether adding surfactants to one-time foliar applications of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) would be as effective as the current industry standard, the basal quick-dip. Terminal, semi-hardwood cuttings of Red Cascade™ miniature climbing rose (Rosa ‘MOORcap’), common camellia (Camellia japonica) and ‘Southern Charm’ magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora ‘Southern Charm’) were sprayed to the drip point using Hortus IBA Water Soluble Salts™ at concentrations of 0 ppm, 50 ppm, 75 ppm, or 100 ppm for rose cuttings or 0 ppm, 500 ppm, 1000 ppm, or 1500 ppm IBA for camellia or magnolia. To serve as an industry control, the basal end of cuttings was immersed for 3 seconds in a solution of either 250 ppm, 4000 ppm or 2500 ppm for rose, camellia, or magnolia, respectively. A foliar application of 1500 ppm after sticking was as effective as the basal quick-dip for cuttings of ‘Southern Charm’, while other spray treatments were less effective. A basal quick-dip was more effective than a foliar spray for rooting cuttings of camellia. Auxin rate had no impact on rooting of Red Cascade™ miniature rose. Our results from this trial affirm the results reported by similar trials into foliar applications of auxin and suggest that the benefits of foliar applications vary from one plant species to another.

Technical Abstract: Use of foliar auxin applications are increasing in the nursery and greenhouse industry. However, previous research has shown that insufficient auxin is absorbed or translocated to the site of action when foliar auxin applications are used. It is theorized that adding surfactants to foliar applications of auxin may help with the absorption and translocation of auxin to the site of action. Research was conducted to determine whether adding surfactants to one-time foliar applications of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) would be as effective as the current industry standard, the basal quickdip. Terminal, semi-hardwood cuttings of Red Cascade™ miniature climbing rose (Rosa ‘MOORcap’), common camellia (Camellia japonica) and ‘Southern Charm’ magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora ‘Southern Charm’) were sprayed to the drip point using Hortus IBA Water Soluble Salts™ at concentrations of 0 ppm, 50 ppm, 75 ppm, or 100 ppm for rose cuttings or 0 ppm, 500 ppm, 1000 ppm, or 1500 ppm IBA for camellia or magnolia. To serve as an industry control, the basal end of cuttings was immersed for 3-s in a solution of either 250 ppm, 4000 ppm or 2500 ppm for rose, camellia, or magnolia, respectively. A foliar application of 1500 ppm after sticking was as effective as the basal quick-dip for cuttings of ‘Southern Charm’, while other spray treatments were less effective. A basal quick-dip was more effective than a foliar spray for rooting cuttings of camellia. Auxin rate had no impact on rooting of Red Cascade™ miniature rose. The goal of commercial plant propagation is to produce high-quality rooted cuttings as quickly as possible. Plant propagation places a large demand on labor within the nursery industry, with one recent report being that labor accounts for >50% of a nursery’s budget. Our results from this trial affirm the results reported by similar trials into foliar applications of auxin suggests that the benefits of foliar applications are species dependent Further work is warranted on examining other auxin and surfactant formulations.