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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Ames, Iowa » National Animal Disease Center » Food Safety and Enteric Pathogens Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #388270

Research Project: Analysis of Genetic Factors that Increase Foodborne Pathogen Fitness, Virulence, and Antimicrobial Resistance Transfer, to Identify Interventions against Salmonella and Campylobacter in Food Animals

Location: Food Safety and Enteric Pathogens Research

Title: Short Chain Fatty Acids and Bacterial Taxa Associated with Reduced Salmonella enterica serovar I 4,[5],12:i:- Shedding in Swine Fed a Diet Supplemented with Resistant Potato Starch

Author
item Trachsel, Julian
item Bearson, Bradley - Brad
item Kerr, Brian
item Shippy, Daniel
item Byrne, Kristen
item Loving, Crystal
item Bearson, Shawn

Submitted to: Microbiology Spectrum
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/17/2022
Publication Date: 5/9/2022
Citation: Trachsel, J.M., Bearson, B.L., Kerr, B.J., Shippy, D.C., Byrne, K.A., Loving, C.L., Bearson, S.M. 2022. Short Chain Fatty Acids and Bacterial Taxa Associated with Reduced Salmonella enterica serovar I 4,[5],12:i:- Shedding in Swine Fed a Diet Supplemented with Resistant Potato Starch. Microbiology Spectrum. Article e0220221. https://doi.org/10.1128/spectrum.02202-21.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1128/spectrum.02202-21

Interpretive Summary: Prebiotics, such as resistant potato starch (RPS), are types of food that help to support beneficial bacteria and their activities in the intestines. Salmonella enterica serovar I 4,[5],12:i:- is a foodborne pathogen that commonly resides in the intestines of pigs without disease, but can make humans sick if unintentionally consumed. Here we show that in Salmonella inoculated pigs, feeding them a diet containing RPS altered the colonization and activity of certain beneficial bacteria in a way that reduced the amount of Salmonella in their feces. Additionally, within those fed RPS, swine with higher abundance of these types of beneficial bacteria had less Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- in their feces. This work illustrates likely synergy between the prebiotic RPS and the presence of certain gut microorganisms to reduce the amount of Salmonella in the feces of pigs and therefore reduce the risk that humans will become ill with MDR Salmonella serovar I 4,[5],12:i:-.

Technical Abstract: Salmonella enterica serovar I 4,[5],12:i:- is a foodborne pathogen of concern because many isolates are multidrug-resistant (resistant to =3 antimicrobial classes) and metal tolerant. In this study, three in-feed additives were individually tested for their ability to reduce Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- shedding in swine: resistant potato starch (RPS), high amylose corn starch, and a fatty acid blend, compared with a standard control diet over 21'days. Only RPS-fed pigs exhibited a reduction in Salmonella fecal shedding, different bacterial community compositions, and different cecal short chain fatty acid (SCFA) profiles relative to control animals. Within the RPS treatment group, pigs shedding the least Salmonella tended to have greater cecal concentrations of butyrate, valerate, caproate, and succinate. Additionally, among RPS-fed pigs, several bacterial taxa (Prevotella_7, Olsenella, and Bifidobacterium, and others) exhibited negative relationships between their abundances of and the amount of Salmonella in the feces of their hosts. Many of these same taxa also had significant positive associations with cecal concentrations of butyrate, valerate, caproate, even though they are not known to produce these SCFAs. Together, these data suggest the RPS-associated reduction in Salmonella shedding may be dependent on the establishment of bacterial cross feeding interactions that result in the production of certain SCFAs. However, directly feeding a fatty acid mix did not replicate the effect. RPS supplementation could be an effective means to reduce multidrug-resistant (MDR) S. enterica serovar I 4,[5],12:i:- in swine, provided appropriate bacterial communities are present in the gut.