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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Davis, California » Western Human Nutrition Research Center » Obesity and Metabolism Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #385251

Research Project: Improving Public Health by Understanding Metabolic and Bio-Behavioral Effects of Following Recommendations in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans

Location: Obesity and Metabolism Research

Title: Low-dose thiamine supplementation of lactating Cambodian mothers improves human milk thiamine concentrations: a randomized controlled trial

Author
item GALLANT, JELISA - Mount Saint Vincent University, Nova Scotia
item CHAN, KATHLEEN - Mount Saint Vincent University, Nova Scotia
item GREEN, TIMOTHY - South Australia Health And Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI)
item WIERINGA, FRANK - Institute For Research And Development (IRD)
item LEEMAQZ, SHALEM - South Australia Health And Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI)
item NGIK, REM - Helen Keller International (HKI), United States
item MEASELLE, JEFFREY - University Of Oregon
item BALDWIN, DARE - University Of Oregon
item MAM, BORATH - Ministry Of Planning-Cambodia
item SOPHONNEARY, PRAK - Ministry Of Health
item YELLAND, LISA - University Of Adelaide
item HAMPEL, DANIELA - University Of California, Davis
item Shahab-Ferdows, Setti
item Allen, Lindsay - A
item JONES, KERRY - University Of Cambridge
item KOULMAN, ALBERT - University Of Cambridge
item PARKINGTON, DAMON - University Of Cambridge
item MEADOWS, SARAH - University Of Cambridge
item KROEUN, HOU - Helen Keller International (HKI), United States
item WHITFIELD, KYLY - Mount Saint Vincent University, Nova Scotia

Submitted to: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/9/2021
Publication Date: 4/7/2021
Citation: Gallant, J., Chan, K., Green, T.J., Wieringa, F.T., Leemaqz, S., Ngik, R., Measelle, J.R., Baldwin, D., Mam, B., Sophonneary, P., Yelland, L.N., Hampel, D., Shahab-Ferdows, S., Allen, L.H., Jones, K.S., Koulman, A., Parkington, D., Meadows, S.R., Kroeun, H., Whitfield, K.C. 2021. Low-dose thiamine supplementation of lactating Cambodian mothers improves human milk thiamine concentrations: a randomized controlled trial. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 114(1):90-100. https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqab052.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqab052

Interpretive Summary: Micronutrient deficiencies are a significant public health problem affecting a large portion of the world’s population. Infants, young children, adolescents and women of reproductive age including pregnant women, are especially susceptible to the health consequences of insufficient micronutrient intakes. However, micronutrient deficiencies are not routinely included in population health surveys, which limits policy, program, and promotion efforts to prevent and treat micronutrient deficiencies. To address one of the barriers to micronutrient assessment, an expert group created a consensus of a desirable target product profile (TPP) to assess micronutrient status, and a blood collection device for use in population surveys. Experts in laboratory medicine, micronutrient assessment, population-based surveys, and product development reviewed proposed TPP standards and collaboratively established minimum and optimal characteristics. These experts defined the target population as infants and children from 6-59 months, adolescents and women of reproductive age 12-49 years including pregnant women. At a minimum, the assessment tool should be a multiplex ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) to measure more than one analyte in a serum or plasma sample prepared from venous blood obtained by a phlebotomist with a 2-week training. Given the proposed use was specific for population surveys, experts agreed the minimum tool could be semi-quantitative, with analytical specificity of 99%. The TPP also considers the variable field environments for testing (e.g. storage conditions and time to results). The consensus TPP developed can be used to guide selection of existing technologies into population-based surveys, as well as future investment in product development. Partnerships focused on research and development—including industry, public sector, nonprofit, and academic institutions—can help advance the field and fill the micronutrient data gap.

Technical Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies are a significant public health problem affecting a large portion of the world’s population. Disproportionately affected populations—infants, young children, adolescents and women of reproductive age including pregnant women — are especially susceptible to the health consequences of insufficient micronutrient intakes. However, assessment of micronutrient deficiencies is not routinely included in population health surveys. This nutrition data gap hampers policy, program, and promotion efforts to prevent and treat micronutrient deficiencies. To address one of the barriers to micronutrient assessment, an expert group created a consensus of a target product profile (TPP) for a micronutrient assessment tool and associated blood collection device for use in population surveys. Experts in laboratory medicine, micronutrient assessment, population-based surveys, and product development reviewed proposed TPP standards and collaboratively established minimum and optimal characteristics. These experts defined the target population as infants and children from 6-59 months, adolescents and women of reproductive age 12-49 years including pregnant women. At minimum, the assessment tool should be a multiplex ELISA formatted for >1 analyte that uses a serum or plasma sample prepared from venous blood obtained by a phlebotomist with a 2-week training. Given the use case was specific for population surveys, experts agreed the minimum tool could be semi-quantitative, with analytical specificity of 99%. The TPP also considers the variable field environments for testing (e.g. storage conditions and time to results). The consensus TPP developed can be used to guide selection of existing technologies into population-based surveys, as well as future investment in product development. Partnerships focused on research and development—including industry, public sector, nonprofit, and academic institutions—can help advance the field and fill the micronutrient data gap.