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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Albany, California » Western Regional Research Center » Foodborne Toxin Detection and Prevention Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #385075

Research Project: Novel Methods for the Mitigation of Human Pathogens and Mycotoxin Contamination of High Value California Specialty Crops

Location: Foodborne Toxin Detection and Prevention Research

Title: Complete Genome Sequence of Enterobacter asburiae Strain AEB30, determined using Illumina and PacBio Sequencing

Author
item TRAN, THAO - Volunteer
item Hnasko, Robert
item Huynh, Steven
item Parker, Craig
item Gorski, Lisa
item McGarvey, Jeffery - Jeff

Submitted to: Microbiology Resource Announcements
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/16/2021
Publication Date: 8/5/2021
Citation: Tran, T., Hnasko, R.M., Huynh, S., Parker, C., Gorski, L.A., McGarvey, J.A. 2021. Complete Genome Sequence of Enterobacter asburiae Strain AEB30, determined using Illumina and PacBio Sequencing. Microbiology Resource Announcements. 10:30. Article e00562-21. https://doi.org/10.1128/MRA.00562-21.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1128/MRA.00562-21

Interpretive Summary: The fresh produce industry has had challenges with contamination of produce by the foodborne pathogen E. coli, resulting in several outbreaks of human disease. We constructed a library of approximately 10 thousand bacteria from the above ground surfaces of plants and screened them for the ability to inhibit the growth of E. coli under laboratory conditions and on cantaloupe melons. We found a bacterium called Enterobacter asburiae that was able to completely inhibit the growth of E. coli under both conditions and sequenced its genome. We describe the genome of this bacterium in this manuscript.

Technical Abstract: The fresh produce industry has had challenges with contamination by the foodborne pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7, resulting in several outbreaks of human disease. We used a novel in vitro fluorescence based growth assay to screen approximately 10 thousand plant phyllosphere associated bacteria for the ability to inhibit the growth of E. coli O157:H7 and identified an isolate that could completely inhibit its growth. We also assayed this bacterium for its ability to inhibit E. coli O157:H7 growth on cantaloupe melons and found that it was also able to inhibit its growth completely. This isolate was identified as Enterobacter asburiae. We sequenced the genome of this bacterium and present our findings here.