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ARS Home » Plains Area » El Reno, Oklahoma » Grazinglands Research Laboratory » Forage and Livestock Production Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #382141

Research Project: Integrated Agroecosystem Research to Enhance Forage and Food Production in the Southern Great Plains

Location: Forage and Livestock Production Research

Title: Grasspea (Lathyrus sativus L.) as a green N source reduces the effects of 2,4 D in susceptile Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivars

Author
item Witt, Travis
item Northup, Brian
item Neel, James - Jim

Submitted to: Crops
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/14/2021
Publication Date: 7/15/2021
Citation: Witt, T.W., Northup, B.K., Neel, J.P. 2021. Grasspea (Lathyrus sativus L.) as a green N source reduces the effects of 2,4 D in susceptile Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivars. Crops. 12:1023-1035. https://doi.org/10.4236/ajps.2021.127070.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4236/ajps.2021.127070

Interpretive Summary: Cotton is a valuable fiber crop, which is again gaining popularity in Oklahoma. One major challenge for cotton producers in Oklahoma and throughout the U.S. cotton belt is 2,4 D drift or tank carry over, because cotton is extremely sensitive to 2,4 D, with losses of yield and ultimately profit to the cotton producer. In this study, six cotton cultivars (three 2,4 D susceptible and three 2,4 D tolerant) were grown in combination of four nitrogen treatments to determine the benefits or drawbacks of using a green manure as a nitrogen source. The negative effects of 2,4 D on cotton growth was partially mitigated by using a green manure as a nitrogen source, though supply of too much nitrogen increased the negative effects of 2,4 D. Applying nitrogen to a susceptible cultivar of cotton contaminated by 2,4 D is not recommended for short season environments like Oklahoma.

Technical Abstract: Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) production in Oklahoma has more than tripled in the last ten years. This increase in cotton acreage in Oklahoma, a region that traditionally produces winter wheat, has led to increased incidences of 2,4 D contamination in sprayers that are used to spray cotton crops. Cotton is extremely sensitive to 2,4 D, with losses of yield and ultimately profit to the cotton producer in cases of drift or tank carryover. In this study, six cotton cultivars (three 2,4 D susceptible and three 2,4 D tolerant) were grown in combination of four N treatments to determine the benefits or drawbacks of using a green manure as N source. Seedcotton, seed, and lint yield were all negatively impacted by 2,4 D in the susceptible cultivars. Additionally, water use was increased in the susceptible cultivars compared to the tolerant cultivars. The negative effects of 2,4 D on cotton growth was partially mitigated by grasspea, though supply of too much nitrogen increased the negative effects of 2,4 D. Applying nitrogen to a susceptible cultivar of cotton contaminated by 2,4 D is not recommended for short season environments like Oklahoma.