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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Byron, Georgia » Fruit and Tree Nut Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #378680

Research Project: New Tools for Managing Key Pests of Pecan and Peach

Location: Fruit and Tree Nut Research

Title: Analysis of the Spatial Distribution and Development of Sequential Sampling Plans for Heteropteran-Associated Fruit Injury in Florida Peaches

Author
item PENCA, CORY - University Of Florida
item HODGES, AMANDA - University Of Florida
item LEPPLA, NORMAN - University Of Florida
item Cottrell, Ted

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/4/2021
Publication Date: 6/14/2021
Citation: Penca, C., Hodges, A.C., Leppla, N.C., Cottrell, T.E. 2021. Analysis of the Spatial Distribution and Development of Sequential Sampling Plans for Heteropteran-Associated Fruit Injury in Florida Peaches. Journal of Economic Entomology. 113(3), 1347-1355. https://doi.org/10.1093/jee/toaa044.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/jee/toaa044

Interpretive Summary: Stink bug injury to peach was sampled at five peach orchards in Florida during two consecutive growing seasons for the purpose of developing a sequential sampling plan to manage stink bugs attacking peach. Th sequential sampling plan developed here required fewer samples to make an accurate classification concerning stink bug injury. This sampling plan is an improvement over simple random sampling, however, further research is needed to determine how to best implement sequential sampling of fruit injury in Florida peach orchards to better inform management decisions.

Technical Abstract: Catfacing and gummosis/sap type injury were sampled at five peach orchards in peninsular Florida during two consecutive growing seasons. The spatial arrangement of injury indicated a random distribution, as determined by Taylors power law. The coefficients from Taylor’s power law were used to develop sequential sampling plans based on hypothetical injury thresholds. Sequential sampling plans were compared to a simple random sample of 10 sample units using a simulation approach. The type I error rate in the sequential sampling plan was 11.49% while in the simple random sample the type 1 error rate was 13.09%. The type II error rate in the sequential sampling plan was 8.66%, 40% lower than the 14.58% type II error rate observed in the simulated SRS. The number of samples required for sequential sampling was dependent on the difference between the orchard injury level and the threshold. When the difference was greater than approximately 0.5 injured fruit per sample, the sequential sampling plan required fewer samples to make an accurate classification. The sequential sampling plans developed in this study are an improvement over simple random sampling, however, further research is needed to determine how to best implement sequential sampling of fruit injury in Florida peach orchards to better inform management decisions.