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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Logan, Utah » Poisonous Plant Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #375591

Research Project: Understanding and Mitigating the Adverse Effects of Poisonous Plants on Livestock Production Systems

Location: Poisonous Plant Research

Title: Herbicide control of broom snakeweed (Gutierrizia sarothrae)

Author
item Stonecipher, Clinton - Clint
item RANSOM, COREY - Utah State University
item THACKER, ERIC - Utah State University
item Welch, Kevin

Submitted to: Poisonous Plant Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/2/2020
Publication Date: 6/8/2020
Citation: Stonecipher, C.A., Ransom, C., Thacker, E., Welch, K.D. 2020. Herbicide control of broom snakeweed (Gutierrizia sarothrae). Poisonous Plant Research. 3:75-82. https://doi.org/10.26077/ze5v-af64.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.26077/ze5v-af64

Interpretive Summary: Broom snakeweed is a native invasive species that is widely distributed across western North America. It is very competitive with other vegetation and can reduce or displace desirable grasses and forbs. Removal of snakeweed from rangelands can result in increased forage production of desirable plant species. The evaluation of new herbicides to determine their efficacy in controlling broom snakeweed assists in providing land managers with alternatives to control broom snakeweed. The objective of this study was to evaluate herbicides applied in the spring to determine efficacy of control of broom snakeweed. Crossbow® had the greatest reduction in snakeweed density at 97 ± 14.6 %. Milestone® and 2,4-D were also effective at reducing snakeweed density at 73 ± 14.6 % control. Our results demonstrate that Crossbow® is effective at controlling broom snakeweed in the spring.

Technical Abstract: Broom snakeweed ( Gutierrezia sarothrae [Pursh] Britton & Rusby) is a native invasive species that is widely distributed across western North America. It is very competitive with other vegetation and can reduce or displace desirable grasses and forbs. Removal of snakeweed from rangelands can result in increased forage production of desirable plant species. The evaluation of new herbicides to determine their efficacy in controlling broom snakeweed assists in providing land managers with alternatives to control broom snakeweed. The objective of this study was to evaluate herbicides applied in the spring to determine efficacy of control of broom snakeweed. 2,4-D + triclopyr had the greatest reduction in snakeweed density at 97 ± 14.6 % (P < 0.0001 ). Aminopyralid and 2,4-D were also effective at reducing snakeweed density at 73 ± 14.6 % control. Our results demonstrate that 2,4-D + triclopyr, a new herbicide, can be used in controlling broom snakeweed in the spring.