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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » Grain Legume Genetics Physiology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #375060

Research Project: Developing Abiotic and Biotic Stress-Resilient Edible Legume Production Systems through Directed GxExM Research

Location: Grain Legume Genetics Physiology Research

Title: Red Clover Vein Mosaic Virus. In: Compendium of Pea Diseases and Pests

Author
item LARSEN, RICHARD - WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY
item Porter, Lyndon
item SCHROEDER, KURT - UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO

Submitted to: American Phytopathological Society Press
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/17/2020
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Red clover vein mosaic virus (RCVMV) was first described in 1937 by Osborne in the U.S. on red clover and later described on pea. The virus has been found throughout Europe, Middle East, New Zealand and Russia. In the U.S., it has principally been found in Wisconsin and the Pacific Northwest. Symptoms include leaf vein clearing, chlorosis, and a mosaic leaf pattern. Plants with early infections often are severly stunted and can die prematurely. Rossetting of flowers can often occur, since plants tend to loose apical dominance. RCVMV is a monopartite, single-stranded, positive-sense RNA Carlavirus. The virus is usually transmitted by the pea and green peach aphids but can also be mechanically transmitted. Seed transmission has been reported in other legume species but not in pea. Management of aphids via an insecticide may help with the secondary transmission of virus to plants. No known host resistance is available to this virus but some pea lines with tolerance to the virus have been identified.

Technical Abstract: Red clover vein mosaic virus (RCVMV) was first described in 1937 by Osborne in the U.S. on red clover and later described on pea. The virus has been found throughout Europe, Middle East, New Zealand and Russia. In the U.S., it has principally been found in Wisconsin and the Pacific Northwest. Symptoms include leaf vein clearing, chlorosis, and a mosaic leaf pattern. Plants with early infections often are severly stunted and can die prematurely. Rossetting of flowers can often occur, since plants tend to loose apical dominance. RCVMV is a monopartite, single-stranded, positive-sense RNA Carlavirus. The virus is usually transmitted by the pea and green peach aphids but can also be mechanically transmitted. Seed transmission has been reported in other legume species but not in pea. Management of aphids via an insecticide may help with the secondary transmission of virus to plants. No known host resistance is available to this virus but some pea lines with tolerance to the virus have been identified.