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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Ames, Iowa » National Animal Disease Center » Ruminant Diseases and Immunology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #373600

Research Project: Identification of Disease Mechanisms and Control Strategies for Bacterial Respiratory Pathogens in Ruminants

Location: Ruminant Diseases and Immunology Research

Title: Complete genome sequences of 16 Mycoplasma bovis isolates from Canadian bison and cattle

Author
item Register, Karen
item Bayles, Darrell
item Ma, Hao
item WINDEYER, CLAIRE - University Of Calgary
item PEREZ-CASAL, JOSE - University Of Saskatchewan
item BRAS, ANA - University Of Calgary
item SULEMAN, MUHAMMAD - University Of Saskatchewan
item WOODBURY, MURRA - University Of Saskatchewan
item JELINSKI, MURRAY - University Of Saskatchewan
item Alt, David

Submitted to: Microbiology Resource Announcements
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/12/2020
Publication Date: 6/4/2020
Citation: Register, K.B., Bayles, D.O., Ma, H., Windeyer, C., Perez-Casal, J., Bras, A., Suleman, ., Woodbury, M., Jelinski, M., Alt, D.P. 2020. Complete genome sequences of 16 Mycoplasma bovis isolates from Canadian bison and cattle. Microbiology Resource Announcements. 9(23):e00325-20. https://doi.org/10.1128/MRA.00325-20.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1128/MRA.00325-20

Interpretive Summary: Mycoplasma bovis was first recognized as a disease agent in cattle Mycoplasma bovis was first recognized as a disease agent in cattlemore than 50 years ago and is today a widespread cause of pneumonia, otitis, arthritis, mastitis and reproductive disorders in dairy and beef cattle. In the early 2000’s, M. bovis also began to appear as a primary disease agent in North American bison and subsequently became one of the most serious and costly infectious disease threats faced by these animals. One theory proposed to explain its relatively recent emergence in bison is that unique, newly evolved strains with an expanded host range or heightened virulence are responsible. Complete genome sequences for 11isolates from cattle have been reported but, until now, none from bison isolates have been available. To better understand the genetic relationship between isolates from cattle and bison and to generate a resource for exploring the genetic basis of disease we sequenced the genomes of 12 bison isolates and four cattle isolates obtained from animals in western Canada.

Technical Abstract: Here we report the complete genome sequences of 12 Mycoplasma bovis isolates cultured from Canadian bison and four cultured from Canadian cattle. The sequences are of value for understanding the phylogenetic relationship between cattle and bison isolates and will aid in elucidating the genetic basis for virulence and host specificity.