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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Gainesville, Florida » Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology » Mosquito and Fly Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #373577

Research Project: Integrated Pest Management of Mosquitoes and Biting Flies

Location: Mosquito and Fly Research

Title: Transfluthrin spatial repellent on US Military camouflage netting reduces tabnids in a warm-temperate environmentT

Author
item Britch, Seth
item Kline, Daniel - Dan
item Linthicum, Kenneth - Ken
item URBAN, JOYCE - Retired ARS Employee
item Dickstein, Ellen
item Aldridge, Robert
item Golden, Frances

Submitted to: Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/1/2020
Publication Date: 9/1/2020
Citation: Britch, S.C., Kline, D.L., Linthicum, K., Urban, J., Dickstein, E.R., Aldridge, R.L., Golden, F.V. 2020. Transfluthrin spatial repellent on US Military camouflage netting reduces tabnids in a warm-temperate environmentT. Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association. 36(3):212-215. https://doi.org/10.2987/20-6933.1.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.2987/20-6933.1

Interpretive Summary: We investigated the capability of a new kind of repellent on US military camouflage netting to reduce collections of biting flies such as horse flies in a warm-humid field environment on the Gulf Coast of Florida. We found that this repellent could significantly reduce a variety of medically and veterinarily important biting flies inside protected areas by up to 96% upon initial treatment and up to 74% after 20 days post-treatment. These results suggest that this compound could be an effective element in the US Department of Defense integrated pest management system and leveraged in civilian scenarios to protect livestock and humans from potential fly-borne infections and disruption of activities caused by painful bites.

Technical Abstract: We investigated the capability of transfluthrin on US military camouflage netting to reduce collections of tabanid biting flies in a warm-temperate field environment on the Gulf Coast of Florida. We found that transfluthrin could significantly reduce collections of a variety of medically and veterinarily important tabanids inside protected areas by up to 96% upon initial treatment and up to 74% after 20 days post-treatment. These results suggest that this compound could be an effective element in the US Department of Defense integrated pest management system and leveraged in civilian scenarios to protect livestock and humans from potential mechanical transmission of pathogens and disruption of activities caused by painful bites.