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ARS Home » Plains Area » Fargo, North Dakota » Edward T. Schafer Agricultural Research Center » Cereal Crops Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #372873

Research Project: Improvement of Biotic Stress Resistance in Durum and Hard Red Spring Wheat Using Genetics and Genomics

Location: Cereal Crops Research

Title: Genetic and physical localization of the gene controlling leaf pigmentation pattern in Medicago truncatula

Author
item YU, XIAOCHENG - University Of Kentucky
item QIN, QIULIN - University Of Kentucky
item WU, XIA - University Of Kentucky
item LI, DANDAN - North Dakota State University
item Yang, Shengming

Submitted to: Genes, Genomes, Genetics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/9/2020
Publication Date: 9/10/2020
Citation: Yu, X., Qin, Q., Wu, X., Li, D., Yang, S. 2020. Genetic and physical localization of the gene controlling leaf pigmentation pattern in Medicago truncatula. Genes, Genomes, Genetics. https://doi.org/10.1534/g3.120.401689.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1534/g3.120.401689

Interpretive Summary: Among the plant flavonoids, anthocyanin is recognized by the health effects on human chronic diseases due to their strong antioxidant activities. However, the genetic mechanisms underlying anthocyanin biosynthesis and accumulation are unknown. In the present study, we used the model legume Medicago truncatula to finely map the LPP1 gene controlling anthocyanin accumulation on leaves. The LPP1 gene was delimited to a 280 kb-region on Chromosome 7, and two promising candidate genes were selected for functional validation. Our work provided a high-resolution genetic map for LPP1, laying a foundation for cloning of this interesting gene.

Technical Abstract: In Medicago truncatula, some ecotypes form a black or purple stain in the middle of adaxial leaf surface due to accumulation of anthocyanins. However, this morphological marker is missing in some other ecotypes, although anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway is not disrupted. Genetic analysis indicated that the lack of the leaf spot of anthocyanins accumulation is a dominant trait, which is controlled by a single gene, LPP1. Genetic mapping indicated that the LPP1 gene was delimited to a 280 kb-region on Chromosome 7. Total of 8 protein-coding genes were identified in the LPP1 locus through gene annotation and sequence analysis. Of those, two genes, putatively encoding MYB-transcription factors, were selected as candidates for functional validation.