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ARS Home » Plains Area » Sidney, Montana » Northern Plains Agricultural Research Laboratory » Agricultural Systems Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #362494

Research Project: Ecologically-Sound Pest, Water and Soil Management Practices for Northern Great Plains Cropping Systems

Location: Agricultural Systems Research

Title: Deficit irrigation for sugarbeet under conventional and no-till production

Author
item NILAHYANE, ABDELAZIZ - New Mexico State University
item CHEN, CHENGCI - Montana State University
item KESHAVARZ, REZA - Colorad0 State University
item Stevens, William - Bart
item Iversen, William - Bill

Submitted to: Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/6/2020
Publication Date: 10/20/2020
Citation: Nilahyane, A., Chen, C., Keshavarz, R., Stevens, W.B., Iversen, W.M. 2020. Deficit irrigation for sugarbeet under conventional and no-till production. Agrosystems, Geosciences & Environment. 3(1). Article e20114. https://doi.org/10.1002/agg2.20114.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/agg2.20114

Interpretive Summary: Shifting from conventional tillage to no-till practice has many benefits but requires adequate management of irrigation water and nitrogen (N) for profitable sugarbeet production. This study was conducted to enhance the sustainability of sugarbeet in eastern Montana by determining the effect of various irrigation water treatments on yield, sugar content, and water use efficiency (WUE) of sugarbeet grown under tilled and no-tilled conditions. Results from 2016 and 2018 showed that deficit irrigation strategy is a beneficial tool to reduce the water use and increase the efficiency of the irrigation scheduling. Deficit irrigation resulted in significant improvement of WUE in both tilled and no-tilled sugarbeet. Root yield and extractable sugar remained stable and did not show significant response to increasing rate of N in this study. High potential for water, energy, and money savings in sugarbeet production may be achieved through no tillage and optimization of irrigation and N management.

Technical Abstract: Shifting from conventional tillage to no-till practice has many benefits but requires adequate management of irrigation water and nitrogen (N) for profitable sugarbeet production. This study was conducted to enhance the sustainability of sugarbeet in eastern Montana by determining the effect of various irrigation water treatments (100%, 66%, and 33% crop evapotranspiration [ET], and two irrigation cutoff time) and N rates (112, 168, 224 kg ha-1) on yield, sugar content, and water use efficiency (WUE) of sugarbeet grown under tilled and no-tilled conditions. Results from 2016 and 2018 showed that deficit irrigation strategy is a beneficial tool to reduce the water use and increase the efficiency of the irrigation scheduling. Deficit irrigation resulted in significant improvement of WUE in both tilled and no-tilled sugarbeet. Root yield and extractable sugar remained stable and did not show significant response to increasing rate of N in this study. Applying at most 160 kg N ha-1 with 501 mm of seasonal water use was found optimal for sugarbeet production in eastern Montana. High potential for water, energy, and money savings in sugarbeet production may be achieved through no tillage and optimization of irrigation and N management.