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Research Project: Management of Temperate-Adapted Fruit, Nut, and Specialty Crop Genetic Resources and Associated Information

Location: National Clonal Germplasm Repository

Title: Status of Rubus germplasm at the US National Clonal Germplasm Repository in Corvallis, Oregon

Author
item Bushakra, Jill
item ALICE, LARRY - WESTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY
item CARTER, KATIE - OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
item DOSSETT, MICHAEL - BRITISH COLUMBIA BLUEBERRY COUNCIL
item Lee, Jana
item LISTON, AARON - OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
item MEIERS, RUTH - UNIVERSITY OF WAGENINGEN
item MULCH, CHRISTINA - OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
item Nyberg, April
item Peterson, Mary
item CLARK, MELISSA
item VINING, KELLY - OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
item WORTHINGTON, MARGARET - UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS
item YIN, MELINDA - UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
item SUTHERLAND, BRITTANY - UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA
item ZURN, JASON
item CLARK, JOHN - UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS
item FINN, CHAD
item Bassil, Nahla
item Hummer, Kim

Submitted to: Acta Horticulturae
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/31/2019
Publication Date: 7/1/2020
Citation: Bushakra, J., Alice, L., Carter, K., Dossett, M., Lee, J.C., Liston, A., Meiers, R., Mulch, C., Nyberg, A.M., Peterson, M.E., Clark, M.C., Vining, K., Worthington, M., Yin, M., Sutherland, B., Zurn, J.D., Clark, J., Finn, C.E., Bassil, N.V., Hummer, K.E. 2020. Status of Rubus germplasm at the US National Clonal Germplasm Repository in Corvallis, Oregon. Acta Horticulturae. 1277:121-128. https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2020.1277.17.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2020.1277.17

Interpretive Summary: The US Department of Agriculture, National Clonal Germplasm Repository is the genebank for blackberries, raspberries, and their crop wild relatives in the United States. The genebank includes 198 species with 2,180 accessions of plants and seeds from 67 countries. The primary collection of heritage cultivars and selections are maintained clonally as containerized plants in greenhouses and screenhouses. Propagules from foundation material are distributed for research purposes as root cuttings with dormant buds, crown divisions, or tip layers, depending on crop requirements and season. Several projects concerning these berry crop genetic and genomic resources are being conducted including 1) determining phylogenetic relationships of 96 Rubus species representatives and cultivars using target capture sequencing; 2) use of a DNA fingerprinting test to establish genetic profiles, confirm identity, and establish parentage in blackberry; 3) determination of sequence variation in genes that control red raspberry resistance to powdery mildew; and 4) identification of the genes responsible for resistance to aphid feeding in black raspberry to reduce the occurrence of the aphid-borne Black raspberry necrosis virus complex in new cultivars. The availability of wide genetic diversity of these plants at the NCGR demonstrates the usefulness of this collection in advancing research to benefit scientists, plant breeders, growers, and consumers of these berry crops.

Technical Abstract: The US Department of Agriculture (USDA), National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR) is the genebank for Rubus (blackberries, raspberries, and their crop wild relatives) in the United States. The genebank includes 198 species with 2,180 accessions of plants and seeds from 67 countries. The primary collection of heritage cultivars and selections are maintained clonally as containerized plants in greenhouses and screenhouses. Propagules from foundation material are distributed for research purposes as root cuttings with dormant buds, crown divisions, or tip layers, depending on crop requirements and season. Several projects concerning Rubus genetic and genomic resources are being conducted including 1) determining phylogenetic relationships of 96 Rubus species representatives and cultivars using target capture sequencing; 2) use of a DNA fingerprinting test to establish genetic profiles, confirm identity, and establish parentage in blackberry; 3) determination of sequence variation in genes that control red raspberry resistance to powdery mildew; and 4) identification of the genes responsible for resistance to aphid feeding in black raspberry to reduce the occurrence of the aphid-borne Black raspberry necrosis virus complex in new cultivars. The availability of wide genetic diversity in Rubus at the NCGR demonstrates the usefulness of this collection in advancing research to benefit scientists, plant breeders, growers, and consumers of these berry crops.