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ARS Home » Plains Area » Fargo, North Dakota » Edward T. Schafer Agricultural Research Center » Sunflower and Plant Biology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #360876

Research Project: Genetic Enhancement of Sunflower Yield and Tolerance to Biotic Stress

Location: Sunflower and Plant Biology Research

Title: Phomopsis stem canker of sunflower in North America: Correlation with climate and solutions through breeding and management

Author
item Hulke, Brent
item MARKELL, SAMUEL - NORTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY
item KANE, NOLAN - UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO
item MATTHEW, FEBINA - SOUTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: OCL - Oilseeds & fats, Crops and Lipids
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/4/2019
Publication Date: 3/28/2019
Citation: Hulke, B.S., Markell, S.G., Kane, N.C., Matthew, F.M. 2019. Phomopsis stem canker of sunflower in North America: correlation with climate and solutions through breeding and management. OCL - Oilseeds & fats, Crops and Lipids. 26:13. https://doi.org/10.1051/ocl/2019011.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1051/ocl/2019011

Interpretive Summary: Plant diseases occur because a susceptible plant is in the presence of a pathogen in an environment that improves the chances of infection. Recent, documented changes in climate in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota have led to a higher chance of warmer conditions with increased precipitation, which are ideal conditions for diseases such as Phomopsis stem canker to occur in sunflower. Besides sunflower, certain crops (e.g. soybean) and weeds (e.g. kochia) also develop Phomopsis disease, and recent research suggests that in some instances, these plants can be infected by the same causal fungal species. This increases reproduction of the pathogen, which increases the likelihood of disease to all susceptible plant species. Improved management and improved crop genetics can play a role in counteracting the effects of climate and other uncontrollable factors on disease risk.

Technical Abstract: Climate change is occurring in the central US and is interacting with agroecological factors to increase biotic stress in sunflower. Certain species of Diaporthe cause Phomopsis stem canker in sunflower and other dicotyledonous weeds and crops. The increase in precipitation already observed in the states of North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota have increased the chances of outbreaks of necrotrophic pathogens, like Diaporthe. We discuss how climate trends, combined with technological, management, and economic interactions, are correlated with increasing incidence of Phomopsis stem canker in these and adjacent areas in North America. Further, we discuss management options and the role of improved sunflower genetics in reducing Phomopsis stem canker outbreak risk.