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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Beltsville, Maryland (BARC) » Beltsville Agricultural Research Center » Bee Research Laboratory » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #354528

Research Project: Managing Honey Bees against Disease and Colony Stress

Location: Bee Research Laboratory

Title: Altered serum metabolite profiling and relevant pathways analysis in rats stimulated by honeybee venom: A new insight into allergy to honeybee venom

Author
item Zhao, Yazhou - Chinese Academy Of Agricultural Sciences
item Zhang, Jianmei - Chinese Academy Of Agricultural Sciences
item Chen, Yanping - Judy
item Li, Zhiguo - Fujian Agricultural & Forestry University
item Ni, Hongyi - Fujian Agricultural & Forestry University
item Peng, Wenjun - Chinese Academy Of Agricultural Sciences
item Su, Songkun - Fujian Agricultural & Forestry University

Submitted to: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/11/2018
Publication Date: 1/11/2018
Citation: Zhao, Y., Zhang, J., Chen, Y., Li, Z., Ni, H., Peng, W., Su, S. 2018. Altered serum metabolite profiling and relevant pathways analysis in rats stimulated by honeybee venom: A new insight into allergy to honeybee venom. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 66(4):871-880. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jafc.7b04160.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.jafc.7b04160

Interpretive Summary: Bee venom is a blend of chemical agents that induce allergic reactions in the human body. In the present study, using a rat model, we characterized the systemic metabolic changes in response to venom stimulation. Our results revealed that honeybee venom could decrease energy production and induce energy stress. Our study also led to the identification of biomarkers for venom stimulation. The results of this study could help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the complex disorders after honeybee venom stimulation and might provide potential new targets for drug discovery.

Technical Abstract: The accelerated urbanization process and changing natural environment have led to frequent incidences of honeybee contact with people. In order to improve our understanding of the disruption in metabolic pathways and cellular responses triggered by honeybee venom stimulation, we compared the changes in serum metabolites of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, either stimulated or not by honeybee venom by performing 1H NMR spectrometry-based metabonomics to identify potential biomarkers. In the present study, a total of 65 metabolites were structurally confirmed and quantified and the following results were obtained. Firstly, by pattern recognition analysis, 14 metabolites were selected as potential biomarkers 3 hrs after venom stimulation. Secondly, metabolic pathway analysis showed that methane metabolism, glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism, tricarboxylic acid cycle, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, arginine and proline metabolism were affected. Finally, the time-dependent metabolic modifications indicated that rats could recover without any medical treatment 24 hrs after venom stimulation. In summary, this new insight into the changes in serum metabolites in rats after honeybee venom stimulation has enhanced our further understanding of the organism's response to honeybee venom.