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Research Project: Pathogen Characterization, Host Immune Response and Development of Strategies to Reduce Losses to Disease in Aquaculture

Location: Aquatic Animal Health Research

Title: On-farm evaluation of three different hatchery sources of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) cultured in on-levee tanks in low salinity waters of west Alabama

Author
item Roy, Luke - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Teichert-coddington, David - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Dahl, Sunni - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Beck, Benjamin
item Shoemaker, Craig
item Whitis, Gregory - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item James, Jesse - AUBURN UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Journal of Applied Aquaculture
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/29/2019
Publication Date: 5/20/2019
Citation: Roy, L.A., Teichert-Coddington, D., Dahl, S., Beck, B.H., Shoemaker, C.A., Whitis, G.N., James, J. 2019. On-farm evaluation of three different hatchery sources of Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) cultured in on-levee tanks in low salinity waters of west Alabama. Journal of Applied Aquaculture. https://doi.org/10.1080/10454438.2019.1614510.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/10454438.2019.1614510

Interpretive Summary: Inland, low salinity shrimp farmers in west Alabama, that produce the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, have recently reported abnormally low survivals at harvest. Reduced survival has also been reported by farms in Florida and Texas. Multiple theories exist as to the cause of increased mortality including disease, toxic algae blooms, water quality, shrimp source, and reduced robustness of shrimp in later stages of production. To compare performance of shrimp from different sources, shrimp were obtained from three different hatcheries and stocked on the same day in three different flow-through systems. One tank system (TS) was installed on one farm (Farm 1-TS) and two systems were installed on two different pond banks of another farm (Farm 2-TS1; Farm 2-TS2). Following 107 days of culture on Farm 2-TS1 and Farm 2-TS2 there were no differences in survival (72.8 – 91.2 %) or final weight (19.8 – 24.6 g) among shrimp sourced from three different hatcheries. At Farm 1-TS, following 111 days of culture there were differences in survival from shrimp sourced from one hatchery (40.5%) compared to the other two hatcheries (61.0 – 69.8%). A large percentage of the mortality in the trial occurred in the first thirty days for two of the tank systems (Farm 2-TS1 and Farm 1-TS). Results of this trial demonstrate that while hatchery source did influence survival on one farm, overall performance was acceptable from all three sources compared to performance of shrimp reared in the production ponds in which the tank systems were housed and drawing water.

Technical Abstract: Inland, low salinity shrimp farmers in west Alabama, that produce the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, have recently reported abnormally low survivals at harvest. Reduced survival has also been reported by farms in Florida and Texas. Multiple theories exist as to the cause of increased mortality including disease, toxic algae blooms, water quality, shrimp source, and reduced robustness of shrimp in later stages of production. To compare performance of shrimp from different sources, shrimp were obtained from three different hatcheries and stocked on the same day in three different flow-through systems. One tank system (TS) was installed on one farm (Farm 1-TS) and two systems were installed on two different pond banks of another farm (Farm 2-TS1; Farm 2-TS2). Following 107 days of culture on Farm 2-TS1 and Farm 2-TS2 there were no differences in survival (72.8 – 91.2 %) or final weight (19.8 – 24.6 g) among shrimp sourced from three different hatcheries. At Farm 1-TS, following 111 days of culture there were differences in survival from shrimp sourced from one hatchery (40.5%) compared to the other two hatcheries (61.0 – 69.8%). A large percentage of the observed mortality in the trial occurred in the first thirty days for two of the tank systems (Farm 2-TS1 and Farm 1-TS). Results of this trial demonstrate that while hatchery source did influence survival on one farm, overall performance was acceptable from all three sources compared to performance of shrimp reared in the production ponds in which the tank systems were housed and drawing water.