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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Bowling Green, Kentucky » Food Animal Environmental Systems Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #352004

Research Project: Developing Safe, Efficient and Environmentally Sound Management Practices for the Use of Animal Manure

Location: Food Animal Environmental Systems Research

Title: Quantifying tetracycline resistance genes in swine waste anaerobic digester over a period of 100 days

Author
item Couch, Melanie - Western Kentucky University
item Agga, Getahun
item Loughrin, John
item Parekh, Rohan
item Antle, Stacy
item Kasumba, John - Western Kentucky University
item Couch, Brandon - Western Kentucky University
item Conte, Eric - Western Kentucky University

Submitted to: American Chemical Society Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/13/2017
Publication Date: 3/11/2018
Citation: Couch, M., Agga, G.E., Loughrin, J.H., Parekh, R.R., Antle, S.W., Kasumba, J., Couch, B., Conte, E.D. 2018. Quantifying tetracycline resistance genes in swine waste anaerobic digester over a period of 100 days. American Chemical Society Abstracts. Paper No. 276.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Unregulated use of growth promoting antibiotics like Tetracyclines in agricultural feeds is becoming an increasing problem in antibiotic resistance. Undigested antibiotics leads to significant concentrations in livestock waste. These concentrations provide continuous selection pressure for the development of antibiotic resistance genes in the environment. Antibiotic resistance related deaths are projected to surpass cancer related deaths by 2050 making antibiotic resistance a pressing public health issue. The purpose of this study is to determine the abundance and persistence of tetracycline (tet) resistance genes in swine waste over a period of 100 days in an anaerobic digester system. Tet(A), tet(B), tet(G), tet(M), tet(O), tet(Q), and tet(W) were quantified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction after DNA extraction. Primers that target ribosomal protection proteins and efflux proteins were used. Antibiotic resistance genes decreased from day one, but were found to be present throughout the study.