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ARS Home » Plains Area » Fort Collins, Colorado » Center for Agricultural Resources Research » Plant and Animal Genetic Resources Preservation » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #350043

Research Project: National Animal Germplasm Program

Location: Plant and Animal Genetic Resources Preservation

Title: Biobanking genetic material for agricultural animal species

Author
item Blackburn, Harvey

Submitted to: Annual Review of Animal Biosciences
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/15/2017
Publication Date: 1/10/2018
Citation: Blackburn, H.D. 2018. Biobanking genetic material for agricultural animal species. Annual Review of Animal Biosciences. 6:69-82. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-animal-030117-014603.

Interpretive Summary: Biobanking animal germplasm and tissues is a major component of conserving genetic resources. Progress has been made internationally in developing national genetic resource collections. As these collections have been developed, it has become apparent that gene banks can serve a multitude of roles, thereby serving short- and long-term needs of research communities and industry. This article documents the development of gene banks and provides examples of how they have been used to date and the extent to which they have captured genetic diversity for future use.

Technical Abstract: Biobanking animal germplasm and tissues is a major component of conserving genetic resources. Effectively constructing such gene banks requires an understanding and evaluation of genetic resources, the ability to conserve various tissues through cryopreservation, and a robust information technology infrastructure to allow managers and potential users to fully understand and make use of the collection. Progress has been made internationally in developing national genetic resource collections. As these collections have been developed, it has become apparent that gene banks can serve a multitude of roles, thereby serving short- and long-term needs of research communities and industry. This article documents the development of gene banks and provides examples of how they have been used to date and the extent to which they have captured genetic diversity for future use.