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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Davis, California » Western Human Nutrition Research Center » Immunity and Disease Prevention Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #348467

Research Project: Assessing the Impact of Diet on Inflammation in Healthy and Obese Adults in a Cross-Sectional Phenotyping Study and a Longitudinal Intervention Trial

Location: Immunity and Disease Prevention Research

Title: Pilot study of probiotic/colostrum supplementation on gut function in children with autism and gastrointestinal symptoms

Author
item Sanctuary, Megan - University Of California, Davis
item Kain, Jennifer - University Of California, Davis
item Chen, Shin Yu - University Of California, Davis
item Kalentra, Karen - University Of California, Davis
item Lemay, Danielle
item Rose, Destanie - University Of California, Davis
item Yang, Hoa - University Of California, Davis
item German, Bruce - University Of California, Davis
item Slupsky, Carolyn - University Of California, Davis
item Ashwood, Paul - University Of California, Davis
item Mills, David - University Of California, Davis
item Smilowtz, Jennifer - University Of California, Davis
item Angkustsiri, Kathleen - University Of California, Davis

Submitted to: PLoS One
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/2/2019
Publication Date: 1/9/2019
Citation: Sanctuary, M., Kain, J., Chen, S., Kalentra, K., Lemay, D.G., Rose, D., Yang, H., German, B.J., Slupsky, C., Ashwood, P., Mills, D., Smilowtz, J.T., Angkustsiri, K. 2019. Pilot study of probiotic/colostrum supplementation on gut function in children with autism and gastrointestinal symptoms. PLoS One. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0210064.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0210064

Interpretive Summary: The health benefits of dietary interventions in humans are more easily observable in cohorts that have compromised health with opportunity for improvement. Children with autism often have gastrointestinal symptoms including chronic constipation, diarrhea, and/or irritable bowel syndrome. In the present study, autistic children with gastrointestinal co-morbidities were recruited to evaluate the effect of a bovine colostrum product, which contains prebiotic oligosaccharides and other immune factors, with or without a probiotic (Bifidobacterium infantis). Eight children completed this cross-over study in a randomized double blind controlled trial. Participants on both treatments saw an improvement in gastrointestinal health and reduction in pro-inflammatory cytokines. A larger clinical trial is needed to validate the efficacy of these treatments.

Technical Abstract: Over half of all children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have gastrointestinal (GI) co-morbidities including chronic constipation, diarrhea, and irritable bowel syndrome. The severity of these symptoms has been correlated with the degree of GI microbial dysbiosis. The study objective was to assess tolerability during administration of a probiotic (Bifidobacterium infantis) in combination with a bovine colostrum product (BCP) as a source of prebiotic oligosaccharides and to evaluate, GI, microbiome and immune factors in children with ASD and GI co-morbidities. This pilot study is a randomized, double blind, controlled trial of combination treatment (BCP + B. infantis) vs. BCP alone in a cross-over study in children ages 2-11 with ASD and GI co-morbidities (n=8). This 12-week study included 5 weeks of probiotic-prebiotic supplementation, followed by a two-week washout period, and 5 weeks of prebiotic only supplementation. Tolerability was assessed using validated questionnaires of GI function and atypical behaviors, along with side effects. Results suggest that the combination treatment is well-tolerated in this cohort. The most common side effects included mild gassiness and weight gain. Participants on both treatments saw an improvement in GI function, a reduction in the frequency of certain GI symptoms as well as reduced occurrence of aberrant behaviors. Improvement may be explained by a reduction in IL-13 and TNF-' production in some participants. Although limited conclusions can be drawn from this small pilot study, the results support the need for further research into the efficacy of these treatments.