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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Bowling Green, Kentucky » Food Animal Environmental Systems Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #347091

Research Project: Developing Safe, Efficient and Environmentally Sound Management Practices for the Use of Animal Manure

Location: Food Animal Environmental Systems Research

Title: Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) forage production, tissue and soil nutrient concentration under three N based broiler litter regimes

Author
item Netthisinghe, Annesly - Western Kentucky University
item Woosley, Paul - Western Kentucky University
item Rowland, Naomi - Western Kentucky University
item Gilfillen, Rebecca - Western Kentucky University
item Willian, Todd - Western Kentucky University
item Sistani, Karamat

Submitted to: ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meeting Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/23/2017
Publication Date: 10/24/2017
Citation: Netthisinghe, A., Woosley, P., Rowland, N., Gilfillen, R., Willian, T., Sistani, K.R. 2017. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) forage production, tissue and soil nutrient concentration under three N based broiler litter regimes. ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meeting Abstracts. Poster No. 1006.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is considered as most important forage legume grown in Kentucky. Alfalfa supports many livestock production systems including the beef, dairy, and horse industries in Kentucky. Being a legume, alfalfa typically meets its N requirement through symbiotic N2 fixation, but has the ability to preferentially utilize mineral N if it is available. As a result, manure application to alfalfa can decrease symbiotic N2 fixation leading to more efficient use of manure N. Alfalfa’s high N removal potential, ability to recycle other manure nutrients, and strong root system that enables nutrient extraction from deeper soil depths provides economic and environmental justification for using manure on alfalfa production. Here, we will present preliminary forage yield and quality results along with soil nutrient concentration gathered after three N based broiler litter amendment rates (100, 50, and 25% of N uptake) and a control treatment with no external N input during the first growing season.