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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Ithaca, New York » Robert W. Holley Center for Agriculture & Health » Plant, Soil and Nutrition Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #346555

Research Project: Enhancing Breeding of Small Grains through Improved Bioinformatics

Location: Plant, Soil and Nutrition Research

Title: Introduction to a special issue on genotype by environment interaction

Author
item De Leon, Natalia - University Of Wisconsin
item Jannink, Jean-luc
item Edwards, Jode
item Kaeppler, Shawn - University Of Wisconsin

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/1/2016
Publication Date: 10/1/2016
Citation: De Leon, N., Jannink, J., Edwards, J.W., Kaeppler, S. 2016. Introduction to a special issue on genotype by environment interaction. Crop Science. 56:2081-2089.

Interpretive Summary: Expression of a phenotype is a function of the genotype, the environment, and the differential sensitivity of certain genotypes to different environments, also known as genotype by environment (G × E) interaction. This special issue of Crop Science includes a collection of manuscripts that reviews the long history of G ×E research, describes new and innovative ideas, and outlines future challenges. Improving our understanding of these complex interactions is expected to accelerate plant breeding progress, minimize risk through improved cultivar deployment, and improve the efficiency of crop production through informed agriculture. Achieving these goals requires the integration of broad and diverse science and technology disciplines.

Technical Abstract: Expression of a phenotype is a function of the genotype, the environment, and the differential sensitivity of certain genotypes to different environments, also known as genotype by environment (G × E) interaction. This special issue of Crop Science includes a collection of manuscripts that reviews the long history of G ×E research, describes new and innovative ideas, and outlines future challenges. Improving our understanding of these complex interactions is expected to accelerate plant breeding progress, minimize risk through improved cultivar deployment, and improve the efficiency of crop production through informed agriculture. Achieving these goals requires the integration of broad and diverse science and technology disciplines.