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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Ithaca, New York » Robert W. Holley Center for Agriculture & Health » Emerging Pests and Pathogens Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #345591

Research Project: Evaluation of Biological Control for Invasive Weeds of the Northeastern United States

Location: Emerging Pests and Pathogens Research

Title: Impact of Abrostola asclepiadis and plant competition on invasive swallow-worts (Vincetoxicum spp.)

Author
item Milbrath, Lindsey
item Biazzo, Jeromy
item DITOMMASO, ANTONIO - Cornell University - New York
item MORRIS, SCOTT - Cornell University - New York

Submitted to: Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/25/2017
Publication Date: 11/5/2017
Citation: Milbrath, L.R., Biazzo, J., Ditommaso, A., Morris, S. 2017. Impact of Abrostola asclepiadis and plant competition on invasive swallow-worts (Vincetoxicum spp.). Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting. Paper No. D3494. (https://esa.confex.com/esa/2017/meetingapp.cgi/Paper/122525).

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Pale and black swallow-wort (Vincetoxicum rossicum and V. nigrum; Apocynaceae, subfamily Asclepiadoideae) are perennial vines from Europe that have become invasive in various terrestrial habitats in the northeastern USA and southeastern Canada. A classical weed biological control program has been in development. Results from previous studies of candidate agents suggest that defoliation may only have a minor to moderate impact under high light conditions. However, the addition of plant competition may enhance the effect of defoliation. We investigated the individual and combined impact of the defoliating moth Abrostola asclepiadis (Denis and Schiffermüller) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and perennial quackgrass (Elymus repens (L.) Gould, Poaceae) on swallow-wort performance, including different insect densities and defoliation frequency. We will discuss the results in relation to the moth’s potential number of generations and projections of a plant population model developed for these invasive plants.