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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Stoneville, Mississippi » Warmwater Aquaculture Research Unit » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #345213

Research Project: Evaluating Nutritional Requirements, Identifying Alternative Ingredients and Improving the Production Environment for Hybrid and Channel Catfish Production

Location: Warmwater Aquaculture Research Unit

Title: Evaluation of porcine meat and bone meal in diets for pond-raised hybrid catfish

Author
item Li, Menghe - Mississippi State University
item Bosworth, Brian
item Lucas, Penelope - Mississippi State University

Submitted to: North American Journal of Aquaculture
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 10/2/2017
Publication Date: 2/13/2018
Citation: Li, M.H., Bosworth, B.G., Lucas, P.M. 2018. Evaluation of porcine meat and bone meal in diets for pond-raised hybrid catfish. North American Journal of Aquaculture. 80(1):69-73.

Interpretive Summary: The majority of dietary protein for channel catfish and hybrid catfish raised in the United States has been traditionally supplied by soybean meal, which is the most abundant protein source in the country and worldwide and contains high protein and balanced amino acid composition for catfish. However, recent soybean meal prices have increased considerably and remain volatile. There have been continued efforts by catfish feed manufacturers to explore other cost-effective protein sources to reduce feed cost. One potential alternative protein for catfish feeds is porcine meat and bone meal (PMBM). Although PMBM is often more expensive than soybean meal, sometimes its prices are similar to or even lower than soybean meal. When prices are favorable, PMBM may be used in catfish feeds even if only for a limited time period. Results from the present study show PMBM could be used at levels up to 25% in the diet without affecting fish growth performance of hybrid catfish. Including PMBM in the diet improves FCR, but diminishes processing yield and increases body fat due to its high fat content. Based on these results and data from our previous studies, it appears 10% PMBM can be used in the diet without markedly affecting processing yield and body composition of pond-raised catfish. Short term use of PMBM at levels up to 25% (when price is favorable) should not be a cause of concern. However, use of high levels of PMBM during later part of the growing season should be avoided because of negative effects on processing yield and fillet fat content.

Technical Abstract: The present study aims to investigate effects of various levels (0, 10, 15, 20, and 25%) of porcine meat and bone meal (PMBM) in diets on production and processing characteristics and body composition of pond-raised hybrid catfish (female Ictalurus punctatus × male Ictalurus furcatus). Fingerlings with a mean initial weight of 58 g/fish were stocked into 0.04-ha earthen ponds at a stocking rate of 14,826 fish/ha. Fish were fed to apparent satiation once a day for 155 d. There were no significant differences in total feed fed, weight gain and survival among dietary treatments, but fish fed diets containing 10% and more PMBM had significantly greater net yield and lower FCR than fish fed the control diet without PMBM. No significant differences were detected for carcass yield and fillet yield among dietary treatments by ANOVA, but carcass yield and fillet yield decreased and fillet fat levels increased linearly as dietary PMBM levels increased. Results from the present study and our previous studies demonstrated 10% PMBM could be used in the diets for an entire growing season without marked impacts on growth, processing yield, and body composition of pond-raised catfish. High levels of PMBM up to 25% may be used when prices are favorable for short-term feeding. However, use of high levels of PMBM during later part of the growing season should be avoided because of negative effects on processing yield.