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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Auburn, Alabama » Aquatic Animal Health Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #343746

Research Project: Pathogen Characterization, Host Immune Response and Development of Strategies to Reduce Losses to Disease in Aquaculture

Location: Aquatic Animal Health Research

Title: Identification of genes encoding the type IX secretion system and secreted proteins in Flavobacterium columnare IA-S-4

Author
item Lafrentz, Benjamin
item Barbier, Paul - University Of Wisconsin
item Mcbride, Mark - University Of Wisconsin
item Evenhuis, Jason

Submitted to: Genbank
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/28/2017
Publication Date: 9/22/2017
Citation: Lafrentz, B.R., Barbier, P., McBride, M., Evenhuis, J. 2017. Identification of genes encoding the type IX secretion system and secreted proteins in Flavobacterium columnare IA-S-4. Genbank. Accession Nos. MF535395-MF535441.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Flavobacterium columnare, a member of the phylum Bacteroidetes, causes columnaris disease in wild and aquaculture-reared freshwater fish. The mechanisms responsible for columnaris disease are not known. Many members of the phylum Bacteroidetes use type IX secretion systems (T9SSs) to secrete enzymes, adhesins, and proteins involved in gliding motility. Proteins secreted by T9SSs have N-terminal signal peptides that facilitate export across the cytoplasmic membrane. They also typically have conserved C-terminal domains (CTDs) that target them for secretion across the outer membrane by the T9SS. The CTD’s are often removed by the protease PorU during or after secretion. A draft genome of F. columnare, strain IA-S-4, was searched to identify the genes encoding for the T9SS and the genes encoding for proteins that are likely secreted through this system. The F. columnare genome has all of the genes (n=9) needed to encode a T9SS. A total of 39 genes were identified whose protein products are likely secreted through the T9SS. The identified genes were submitted to GenBank and the sequences will be used to determine the role of the T9SS in the virulence of F. columnare.