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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Raleigh, North Carolina » Plant Science Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #342992

Research Project: Strategies to Predict and Mitigate the Impacts of Climate Variability on Soil, Plant, Animal, and Environmental Interactions

Location: Plant Science Research

Title: Use the nitrogen on your farm – then fertilize if needed!

Author
item Franzluebbers, Alan

Submitted to: Progressive Forage Grower
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/18/2017
Publication Date: 12/20/2017
Citation: Franzluebbers, A.J. 2017. Use the nitrogen on your farm – then fertilize if needed!. Progressive Forage Grower. 9 (Oct 2017):18-20.

Interpretive Summary: Nitrogen is often the most limiting nutrient in agricultural systems. Fertilizer nitrogen gives potentially high return to farmers through greatly enhanced yield. However, if soil is nurtured with management to accumulate soil organic matter and develop highly functional nutrient cycling, then the need for fertilizer nitrogen can be greatly reduced. Soil testing does not currently account for these changes in soil health, leading to potential over-application of nitrogen and deterioration of water quality. An ARS scientist in the Plant Science Research Unit in Raleigh NC discussed some of the preliminary research findings of a research project aimed at improving economic return from fertilizer application to stockpiled tall fescue in the Mid-Atlantic region.

Technical Abstract: Nitrogen is often the most limiting nutrient in agricultural systems. Fertilizer nitrogen gives potentially high return to farmers through greatly enhanced yield. However, if soil is nurtured with management to accumulate soil organic matter and develop highly functional nutrient cycling, then the need for fertilizer nitrogen can be greatly reduced. Soil testing does not currently account for these changes in soil health, leading to potential over-application of nitrogen and deterioration of water quality. An ARS scientist in the Plant Science Research Unit in Raleigh NC discussed some of the preliminary research findings of a research project aimed at improving economic return from fertilizer application to stockpiled tall fescue in the Mid-Atlantic region.