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Research Project: Pathogen Characterization, Host Immune Response and Development of Strategies to Reduce Losses to Disease in Aquaculture

Location: Aquatic Animal Health Research

Title: The effects of dietary inclusion of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product in a commercial catfish ration on growth, immune readiness, and columnaris disease

Author
item Mohammed, Haitham - Auburn University
item Brown, Taylor - Auburn University
item Beck, Benjamin
item Aksoy, Mediha
item Eljack, Rashida
item Peatman, Eric - Auburn University

Submitted to: Journal of Applied Aquaculture
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/25/2018
Publication Date: 7/24/2018
Citation: Mohammed, H.H., Brown, T.L., Beck, B.H., Aksoy, M., Eljack, R.M., Peatman, E. 2018. The effects of dietary inclusion of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product in a commercial catfish ration on growth, immune readiness, and columnaris disease. Journal of Applied Aquaculture. https://doi.org/10.1080/10454438.2018.1499576.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/10454438.2018.1499576

Interpretive Summary: Aquaculture is the fastest growing sector of animal agriculture. However, sustainable expansion and intensification of aquaculture worldwide has been severely hampered by disease. In the US catfish industry, the largest segment of US aquaculture, disease-based mortality levels can reach nearly 60% over the course of a production cycle. Columnaris disease, caused by the bacterial species Flavobacterium columnare, represents one of the largest sources of mortality in the industry. Despite its importance, there are currently few effective weapons available to combat this debilitating pathogen. Catfish producers are eager to gain protection against columnaris and other diseases in a more natural and cost-effective manner, i.e. through diets supplemented to provide for health while preserving performance such as growth. Here, we evaluated a yeast fermentation product called Diamond-V XPC. The trial featured four different levels of the yeast which were added to a commercial 32% protein floating catfish diet. Following six weeks of feeding, we observed more resistance to columnaris disease and saw significant changes in the levels of immune markers in the blood. Our results highlight the protective benefits of an emerging dietary additive for the protection of farmed fish from disease.

Technical Abstract: Aquaculture is the fastest growing sector of animal agriculture. However, sustainable expansion and intensification of aquaculture worldwide has been severely hampered by disease. In the US catfish industry, the largest segment of US aquaculture, disease-based mortality levels can reach nearly 60% over the course of a production cycle. Columnaris disease, caused by Flavobacterium columnare, represents one of the largest sources of mortality in the industry. Despite its importance, there are currently few effective weapons available to combat this debilitating pathogen. Catfish producers are eager to gain protection against columnaris and other diseases in a more natural and cost-effective manner, i.e. through diets supplemented to provide for both mucosal health and performance. Here, we evaluated a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product called Diamond-V XPC. The trial featured four levels of inclusion which were added to a commercial 32% protein floating catfish ration. Following six weeks of feeding, we observed heightened resistance to columnaris disease and saw significant changes in the levels of immune effectors in the serum including lysozyme, complement, and immunoglobulin. Our results stress the importance of understanding and prioritizing the protective benefits of dietary ingredients for aquaculture species alongside more typical consideration of a species’ minimal nutritional requirements.