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ARS Home » Plains Area » Fargo, North Dakota » Edward T. Schafer Agricultural Research Center » Cereal Crops Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #342484

Research Project: Genetic Improvement of Durum and Spring Wheat for Quality and Resistance to Diseases and Pests

Location: Cereal Crops Research

Title: Dissecting the sea wheatgrass genome to transfer biotic stress resistance and abiotic stress tolerance into wheat

Author
item Li, Wanlong - South Dakota State University
item Langham, Marie - South Dakota State University
item Ma, Qin - South Dakota State University
item Xu, Steven

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/27/2017
Publication Date: 8/7/2017
Citation: Li, W., Langham, M.A., Ma, Q., Xu, S.S. 2017. Dissecting the sea wheatgrass genome to transfer biotic stress resistance and abiotic stress tolerance into wheat [abstract]. National Association of Plant Breeders, August 7-10, 2017, Davis, CA.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Wheat production is facing numerous challenges from biotic and abiotic stresses. Alien gene transfer has been an effective approach for wheat germplasm enhancement. Sea wheatgrass (SWG) (Thinopyrum junceiforme, 2n = 4x = 28, genomes J1J1J2J2) is a distant relative of wheat and a relatively untapped source for wheat improvement. We have identified high tolerance to waterlogging, manganese toxicity, heat and low nitrogen and resistance to wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), Fusarium head blight and wheat stem sawflies (due to solid stem) in SWG. To facilitate simultaneous discovery and transfer of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for the biotic stress resistance and abiotic stress tolerance more efficiently, we propose to dissect the SWG genome with two objectives: (1) Develop a draft SWG genome assembly for genome-specific markers; and (2) Construct as SWG chromosome library in wheat consisting of 14 wheat-SWG addition lines. Our long-term goal is to broaden the wheat genetic basis and develop novel germplasm that will contribute to a more sustainable wheat industry. We crossed and backcrossed wheat-SWG amphiploid with wheat and developed large backcross populations, which showed great segregation in plant height, architecture, spike morphology, fertility, and resistance to waterlogging and WSMV. We also isolated DNA from these populations. We have sequenced 40× coverage of the SWG genome, and effort is underway to assemble the SWG draft genome, from which SWG-specific markers will be developed and used to genotype backcrossed populations.