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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » Grain Legume Genetics Physiology Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #341117

Research Project: Enhanced Disease and Abiotic Stress Resistance in Edible Legumes

Location: Grain Legume Genetics Physiology Research

Title: Phenotypic diversity for seed mineral concentration in North American dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm of Middle American ancestry

Author
item Mcclean, Phillip - North Dakota State University
item Moghaddam, Samira - North Dakota State University
item Lopez-millan, Ana-flor - Baylor College Of Medicine
item Brick, Mark - Colorado State University
item Kelly, James - Michigan State University
item Miklas, Phillip - Phil
item Osorno, Juan - North Dakota State University
item Porch, Timothy - Tim
item Urrea, Carlos - University Of Nebraska
item Soltani, Ali - Michigan State University
item Grusak, Michael

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/5/2017
Publication Date: 11/1/2017
Citation: McClean, P., Moghaddam, S.M., Lopez-Millan, A., Brick, M., Kelly, J., Miklas, P.N., Osorno, J., Porch, T.G., Urrea, C., Soltani, A., Grusak, M.A. 2017. Phenotypic diversity for seed mineral concentration in North American dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm of Middle American ancestry. Crop Science. 57:3129-3144. https://doi.org/10.2135/cropsci2017.04.0244.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.2135/cropsci2017.04.0244

Interpretive Summary: Dry beans are an important sources of dietary nutrients for humans. Bean breeders have been interested in developing cultivars that are even more nutritious, but baseline information on mineral concentrations across existing cultivars has been limited. In this study, we assessed the concentrations of individual minerals in seeds of a broad range of bean cultivars representing all the major bean market classes. The cultivars were grown in replicated field trials at several locations across the United States. Significantly higher concentrations for the majority of the minerals was observed for white-seeded cultivars. Modern cultivars (developed since 1997) had equal or increased seed mineral concentrations compared to older cultivars. The results suggest that progress could be made to increase bean seed mineral concentrations through appropriate selection of parental breeding lines from this collection of cultivars.

Technical Abstract: Dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seeds are a major protein, carbohydrate, and mineral source for human diets in multiple regions of the world. Seed mineral biofortification is an going objective to improve this important food source. The objective of this research was to assess the seed mineral concentration of five macroelements and eight microelements in a large panel (n=277) of modern race Durango and race Mesomerica genotypes to determine if variability existed that could be exploited for targeted seed biofortification. Varieties that derive from these races are found in many diets throughout the world. The panel was grown in replicated trials under typical production conditions in the major bean growing regions of the United States, and a subset of the panel was also grown in replicated trials at three locations under control and terminal drought conditions. Except for K, seed mineral concentrations were higher for race Mesoamerica genotypes. Significantly higher seed concentrations for the majority of the minerals were observed for white-seeded genotypes and race Durango genotypes with the now preferred intermediate, upright growth. Modern genotypes (since 1997) had equal or increased mineral concentrations compared to older genotypes. Drought affected mineral content differentially. The high heritability for the population implies that breeding progress for increased seed mineral concentration can be achieved by parental selection from this panel.