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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Ithaca, New York » Robert W. Holley Center for Agriculture & Health » Emerging Pests and Pathogens Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #337480

Research Project: Management and Biology of Arthropod Pests and Arthropod-borne Plant Pathogens

Location: Emerging Pests and Pathogens Research

Title: Protein interaction networks at the host-microbe interface in Diaphorina citri, the insect vector of the citrus greening pathogen

Author
item Ramsey, John - John
item CHAVEZ, JUAN - University Of Washington
item JOHNSON, RICHARD - University Of Washington
item MAHONEY, JACLYN - Boyce Thompson Institute
item MOHR, JARED - Cornell University - New York
item ROBISON, FAITH - Boyce Thompson Institute
item ZHONG, XUEFEI - University Of Washington
item Hall, David
item MACCOSS, MICHAEL - University Of Washington
item BRUCE, JAMES - University Of Washington
item Heck, Michelle

Submitted to: International Research Conference on Huanglongbing
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/1/2017
Publication Date: 2/1/2017
Citation: Ramsey, J.S., Chavez, J., Johnson, R., Mahoney, J., Mohr, J., Robison, F., Zhong, X., Hall, D.G., Maccoss, M., Bruce, J., Heck, M.L. 2017. Protein interaction networks at the host-microbe interface in Diaphorina citri, the insect vector of the citrus greening pathogen. International Research Conference on Huanglongbing. 4(2):160545. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsos.160545.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1098/rsos.160545

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: The Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) is the insect vector responsible for the worldwide spread of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (CLas), the bacterial pathogen associated with citrus greening disease. Developmental changes in the insect vector impact pathogen transmission, such that D. citri transmission of CLas is more efficient when bacteria are acquired by nymphs as compared to adults. We hypothesize that expression changes in the D. citri immune system, including the insect's commensal microbiota, occur during development and regulate vector competency. In support of this hypothesis, more proteins, with greater fold changes, were differentially expressed in response to CLas in adults as compared to nymphs, including insect proteins involved in bacterial adhesion and immunity. Discovery of protein interaction networks has broad applicability in the study of host-microbe relationships. Using Protein Interaction Reporter (PIR) technology, we show how protein interaction networks in a D. citri are regulated during development and in response to CLas-infected citrus trees. Notably, a hemocyanin protein highly upregulated in response to CLas was found to physically interact with the CLas coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis enzyme phosphopantothenoylcysteine synthetase/decarboxylase. In addition, hemocyanin was found to physically interact with several other D. citri signaling and stress response proteins. Co-evolved protein interaction networks at the host-microbe interface are highly specific targets for controlling the insect vector responsible for the spread of citrus greening.